The journey of a 1000 miles begins with a single step

Mind

Defilements

The Buddha, having contemplated his mind, gave up the two extremes of practice – indulgence in pleasure and indulgence in pain – and in his first discourse expounded the Middle Way between these two. But we hear his teaching and it grates against our desires. We’re infatuated with pleasure and comfort, infatuated with happiness, thinking we are good, we are fine – this is indulgence in pleasure. It’s not the right path. Dissatisfaction,
displeasure, dislike and anger – this is indulgence in pain. These are the extreme ways which one on the path of practice should avoid.
These ‘ways’ are simply the happiness and unhappiness which arise. The ‘one on the path’ is this very mind, the ‘one who knows’. If a good mood arises we cling to it as good, this is indulgence in pleasure. If an unpleasant mood arises we cling to it through dislike – this is indulgence in pain. These are the wrong paths, they aren’t the ways of a meditator. They’re the ways of the worldly, those who look for fun and happiness and shun unpleasantness and suffering.

The wise know the wrong paths but they relinquish them, they give them up. They are unmoved by pleasure and pain, happiness and suffering. These things arise but those who know don’t cling to them, they let them go according to their nature. This is right view. When one knows this fully there is liberation. Happiness and unhappiness have no meaning
for an Enlightened One.

The Buddha said that the Enlightened Ones were far from defilements. This doesn’t mean that they ran away from defilements, they didn’t run away anywhere. Defilements were there. He compared it to a lotus leaf in a pond of water. The leaf and the water exist together, they are in contact, but the leaf doesn’t become damp. The water is like defilements and the
lotus leaf is the enlightened mind�.
Ajahn Chah

 
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Your mind is as limitless as sky

This sacred substance [the nature of everything] we have to, and should, respect, appreciate, uphold and cherish it as it is. I will give a simple example, when you feel shaky, kind of not certain and become confused, then face a mountain and look at the mountain. Mountains do not move. And when you feel so small and so incapable, so inferior, then look at the sky. Your mind is as limitless as sky. You are limitless. You have no limitation. You are not inferior or incapable, that has no space. Space is limitless. Mind is like space, in fact mind is space. That is why some of you could be born here and have come from billions of light years away, because for mind, it covers everything, it is all-pervading. Therefore, you can die billions of light years away and be born here in a split second. It does not take millions of light years to get here.

– Tai Situ Rinpoche

from the book “Nectar of Dharma: The Sacred Advice, Volume Two”
ISBN: 978-1877294426 – http://amzn.to/13h99q3

Just Dharma Quotes


Monkey mind

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Cultivating trust in simplicity

The quintessential teaching of the Buddha — the nature of mind — is difficult to understand, not because it is complicated but because of its unbearably naked quality. One common method for deciphering the truth is through commentaries, analysis, arguments, and research. But the more we try to decipher this simplicity through academic studies and intellectual analysis, the more we get sidetracked, deterred, or worse, we end up constructing very convincing concepts that we mistake for the simplicity itself. Therefore, one must work hard to accumulate merit. Accumulating merit is the one and only way to cultivate trust in simplicity. But many of us have to first convince ourselves that accumulation of merit works.

– Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche


Big mind

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Suzukis and Zen


Everything in the universe is created by our own mind

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Everything in the universe is created by our own mind. Our mind is the source of all phenomena. Form, sound, smell, taste, and tactile perception such as hot and cold, hard and soft—these are all creations of our mind. They do not exist as we usually think they do. Our consciousness is like an artist, painting every phenomenon into being. Once you have attained the state of the realm of no materiality, you will have succeeded. The realm of no materiality is the state in which we see that no phenomenon exists outside of our own mind.

– Thich Nhat Hanh, in “Old Path White Clouds: The Life Story of the Buddha”.
(Image: Celia Anahin)

Thich Nhat Hanh gems


We are not the thinker

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Creative Systems Thinking