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Prayer

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Tao & Zen

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A Hindu Priest Explains How Your Subconscious Mind Can be Reprogrammed

Create positive changes in your life by reprogramming your unconscious mind.

Source: A Hindu Priest Explains How Your Subconscious Mind Can be Reprogrammed – Waking Times

Waking Times

Vic Bishop, Staff Writer

September 8, 2017
 

The subconscious mind is akin to that unseen portion of an iceberg which remains underwater. Some believe that up to 95% of our mental activity takes place in the subconscious, just below our conscious awareness. This ‘underwater’ portion of the mind is never inactive, though, as it continues to collect and process information even when we are asleep.

According to the Freudian model of the unconscious, the contents of the subregions of the mind are the primary guiding influence on a person’s behavior, habits and urges. And in his study of the psyche, revered psychoanalyst Carl Jung relates the importance of paying attention to what is going on in the lower parts of the mind, saying, “until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.”

While this model may be debatable to some scientists, sages and those devoted to personal development have long known that these regions of the mind are programmable with conscious intention, a process which can be achieved with affirmation and mantra.

As a spiritual tool, monks of the eastern traditions have been using mantras since time immemorial, most recognizably along with prayer beads. The value of this type of meditation is well-understood by practitioners, although, difficult to quantify. It offers a simple but powerful means of creating the emergence of desired positive outcomes in personality, habits, beliefs and emotions.

“Mantra is really just a specialized grouping of sounds and vibrations which positively affect the mental and physiological planes. The effects of sound on the brain have been demonstrated in Electro Encephala Graph (EEG) charts as well as by documented physical changes (skin temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate among them). While we may consciously want to remove certain thought patterns, they can be difficult to dislodge because they are formed at subconscious levels. This is where mantra can be very effective.” ~Christina Sarich

Speaking on how this process works, Hindu priest and international speaker Dandapāni explains how mantras are similar to affirmations in how they work to reprogram the subconscious mind. In an interview with Brian Rose of London Real, Dandapāni answers the question of why the simple concentrated repetition of sound can so powerfully brings about positive changes in personal behavior.

“You can say they are prayer beads, but they’re actually more like affirmation or mantra beads. So, we use these to actually program our subconscious. So as we chant on each bead, we chant an affirmation. I am happy, or I’m confident. And we repeat the same chant over and over again, and there are 108 beads… one chant over and over again.”

There is more to it than just saying a phrase 108 times, however, and as he explains, three ingredients are necessary: “Concise choice of positive words, clear visualization, and a corresponding feeling.”

The process of visualization is extremely important in clarifying for the mind the precise object in focus. If you were to chant, ‘I love apples,’ the brain would become confused by the word apple, however, unless a very clear picture of the apple is presented along with the mantra.

Regarding a corresponding feeling, he explains how feeling is emotion and emotion is energy, quoting the late Nikola Tesla.

“He [Tesla] had this beautiful saying which kind of encapsulates Hindu philosophy really well. He said that, ‘to find the secrets of the universe, think in terms of energy, frequency and vibration.’ Everything is made up of energy that’s vibrating at its own frequency. What we believe is that if your subconscious is filled with patterns that are vibrating at a certain frequency… and if you can go into your subconscious and create a pattern, infuse it with energy that’s vibrating at a certain frequency, you can attract things of a similar nature to it.”

The combined of effect of intentionally applying sound, visualization and emotion to create positive change can override the contents of the subconscious mind. He elaborates further in the video below:

Read more articles by Vic Bishop.

About the Author

Vic Bishop is a staff writer for WakingTimes.com and OffgridOutpost.com Survival Tips blog. He is an observer of people, animals, nature, and he loves to ponder the connection and relationship between them all. A believer in always striving to becoming self-sufficient and free from the matrix, please track him down on Facebook.


Buddham Saranam Gacchami (3 min)

Buddham Sharanam Gachami, Dhammam Sharanam Gachami, Sangham Sharanam Gachami”: This chant is an important aspect of the Buddhist path. Sadhguru says, “When Gautama spoke, he put all these three things together: Buddham Sharanam, Dhammam Sharanam, Sangham Sharanam – all three are equally important. The Buddha, the enlightened one; the Dhamma, the method he gave; and the Sangha, all the people who are seeking, all these are equally important because if you are not among seekers, you will become something else. If you are among smokers, you become a smoker. If you are among drinkers, you become a drinker. If you are among seekers, you become a seeker. It is equally important whether people are supporting each other’s lies or are helping each other shed the lies.”


Buddhist prayer

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Evoking the presence of love, let us fill our hearts with our own compassion – towards ourselves and towards all living beings. May all realize that we are of one family, all brothers and sisters, all nourished from the same source of life. May the wisdom of compassion guide us forward, leading all living beings to deeper peace.


Aspiration

Source: Aspiration | Great Middle Way 

Aug 15, 2017

image002May no living creature suffer, commit evil or ever fall ill.

May no one be afraid or belittled, with a mind weighed by depression.

May the blind see forms and the deaf hear sounds.

May those who are worn with toil be restored on finding repose.

May the naked find clothing and the hungry find food.

May the thirsty find water and delicious drinks.

May the poor find wealth and those weak with sorrow find joy.

May the forlorn find courage, constant happiness and prosperity.

May all who are sick and ill quickly be freed from their ailments.

Whatever illness there is in the world, may it never occur again.

May the frightened cease to be afraid and those bound be freed.

May the powerless find power and may all sentient beings wish to benefit each other.

Just like space and the great elements, such as earth,

may I always support the life of all the boundless beings.

And until they pass away from pain,

may I also be the source of life for all the realms of varied beings

that reach unto the ends of space.

—Shantideva


Bodhisattva Prayer

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May I be a guard for those who need protection.
A guide for those on the path.
A boat, a raft, a bridge for
those who wish to cross the flood.

May I be a lamp in the darkness.
A resting place for the weary.
A healing medicine for all who are sick.
A vase of plenty, a tree of miracles.

And for the boundless multitudes of living beings
May I bring sustenance and awakening
Enduring like the earth and sky
Until all beings are freed from sorrow
And all are awakened.

~ Shantideva’s Bodhisattva Prayer
Performed each morning by HH the Dalai Lama ~


Tibetan Wind Horse Prayer

As Wind carries our prayers
for Earth and All Life,
may respect and love light our way.
May our hearts be filled with compassion
for others and for ourselves.
May peace increase on Earth.
May it begin with me.
– Tibetan prayer flag is ‘Lung ta’,
meaning ‘Wind Horse’

Prayer Vs Meditation

Source: Meditation Masters


Dudjom Rinpoche on Climate Change 2012

Source: ECOBUDDHISM :: Dudjom Rinpoche 2012

http://www.ecobuddhism.org

Posted Dec 4, 2016

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Ecobuddhism:
Since the last time we spoke about this subject, five years ago Rinpoche, the gravity of the climate crisis is even better understood. The leading climate scientist, Dr James Hansen of NASA is publishing a large multiple-author study which makes it clear that there must be a great change in current policies if we are going to avert the danger of crossing a “tipping point” in the climate system–whereby the whole process will become self-generating and pass beyond human influence.  In essence, he says, we have ten more years to make fundamental changes in the way our society uses energy and treats the natural world.

The well-known Buddhist teacher, Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh, who is now 86, is making a tour of the world to emphasize what he calls “falling in love with the Earth again.” He considers that by the end of this century, there may be no human beings on the Earth.  He asks for a deep change of values. Therefore there seems to be the need for people to dedicate their practice, whatever that may be, for the protection of the Earth.

Dudjom Rinpoche:
There are excellent prayers focusing on protecting the Earth and environment written by Chatral, Dzongsar Khyenste Chokyi Lodro and Jigdral Yeshe Dorje Rinpoches. They are quite extensive, beneficial to recite and will have positive effects.

From a Tibetan Buddhist perspective, we could say that Guru Rinpoche is the source of all our dharma traditions. Not only the lineage of the Nyingmapa,  but even the Sarma schools like the Geluk, have a special relationship with Guru Rinpoche. The lineage of the Great Perfection is unique to the Nyingmapa, but all Tibetan traditions of Buddhism are based upon a Nyingma template.

We consider Guru Rinpoche, Tara and Chenrezig to be the three primary protectors throughout the three times. They are united within a single wisdom intent, gazing upon all beings with compassion, continuously raining blessings on the outer universe and its inner contents—the world and all the living beings it contains. We make Dharma prayers to invoke these blessings.

Now from a worldly perspective, I agree completely with the scientific findings on climate change.  When we consider the direction in which the global economy is moving and the kind of activities humans are engaging in, it is certain the outcome will be great harm for the world system.  The general situation is most precarious: there will be no stability for the entire world and the beings in it.

From a religious perspective – and I’m not talking here about exalted teachings like the Great Perfection – even ordinary religious followers cannot feel happy in view of what is going on.  We Buddhists believe the twelve links of interdependence are undeceiving. From that perspective too, the situation is very serious. I am just one religious teacher, without anything special to say. Yet I would ask that all people in this world think in terms of the common good, rather than focusing solely on their own benefit.

We share this one world. In order to uplift and preserve our environment, it definitely matters how we conduct ourselves in the collective sphere.   We have to consider what will really benefit sentient beings, both short and long-term, with respect to environmental change. It is important to give careful consideration to the long term continuity of the human race and future generations.

We might feel a year is a long time, but the fact is that a whole decade goes by quickly.  So it is essential to change our way of thinking and go beyond the obsession with private gain. Taking the state of the whole world into account is our universal responsibility now.  It makes oneself happy and it accomplishes the welfare of others.  It is our duty to care for the global environment. Let us reflect carefully on this.

To Buddhist followers, I would ask you to please examine the evidence, and determine the causative factors concerned.  On the basis of what you find, please act accordingly and ethically.  Non-Buddhists who see validity in this approach can also choose to act appropriately, in light of their own enquiry and values.

When we reflect on the unfolding of recent history, it is clear how great the scale is of what has already occurred.  We used to have all these beautiful and pristine snow mountains. Now their glaciers are undeniably melting. Many places in the world are experiencing tremendous heat.  Other places are experiencing great floods. New diseases are coming up and are reducing life expectancy for some. Things have certainly changed, and they are continuing to do so.

Although we must disseminate this information, there is the difficulty that it has the potential to bring about fear.  Nonetheless, it is beneficial for the scientific community to spread the evidence they have gathered as extensively as possible. A religious leader who talks about these issues can influence only those persons with devotion—the advice is unlikely to spread far.  Out of 100 people, perhaps one will listen. Yet those who consider these topics deeply can make significant changes by taking their inner meaning to heart.

Ecobuddhism:
Another problem has arisen in that climate science is being actively undermined by the proponents of the industrial economy, and even certain governments and the media.   Scientists are feeling increasingly anxious that their advice is not being communicated to the general public. Some senior scientists now acknowledge this is primarily a moral issue and a question of values. It is beyond the scope of science.  That implies that the global ecological crisis is a spiritual crisis. Finally, there has historically been contention between religion and science. A meeting of minds between them is not easy to accomplish.

Dudjom Rinpoche:
Yes, a partial conflict between science and religion exists. As does a conflict between climate science and modern industrial society.

If we examine the opposition between science and religion from a Buddhist perspective, the law of cause and result (karma) is what underlies the Buddhist belief in past and future lives. Scientists generally address themselves only to this one life, in an individualistic manner.

The scientific focus on this single life could be associated with materialism and used to justify neglect of the common good. What appears to our senses or instruments comes to define truth. What is not perceived in that way becomes insignificant and has no value.  Only phenomena said to be “objective” are believed to truly exist.

The Buddhist view holds that virtuous causes bring happiness, and prepare the ground for full awakening.  A conventional scientific perspective would dismiss the phenomena of lower realms and of deity as non-existent. Nonetheless, I think it would be excellent to find common ground between the scientific and religious worldviews.  It might be difficult for them to become very close. But it is also not desirable for there to be a great divide.

I am not just speaking about the Buddhist religion.  When we consider the religious traditions of the world, such as Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and so forth, the followers of Buddhism are relatively small in number.  Most people follow one of the first three traditions.  All possess teachings on compassion, and in some way focus on a process of mental transformation. This is really what religion is about: developing the mind.

People unaligned with any spiritual tradition may find it easier simply to proceed on the basis of scientific evidence.  If this leads them to a clear sense of how to address collective and environmental issues, that will be excellent for themselves and others.

Some materialists assert this is the only life we have. This view could limit their understanding of the global environmental crisis. Buddhists believe that in future lifetimes we experience the karmic consequences of our present life’s actions. There is an added significance to the choices we make now. We ourselves are the ones who will experience the world we leave to future generations.

Dudjom Rinpoche, Sangye Pema Shepa, born in Tibet in 1990, is the head of the DudjomTersar lineage of Nyingma Buddhism. This interview took place in Pharping, Nepal in March 2012. Thanks to Christina Monson for her capable translation.


May you walk gently through the world

 May the sun bring you new energy by day
May the moon softly restore you by night
May the rain wash away your worries
May the breeze blow new strength into your being
May you walk gently through the world
and know it’s beauty all the days of your life

~ Apache Blessing ~

Source: Tao & Zen