The journey of a 1000 miles begins with a single step

Anger

The courage not to succumb

When we examine anger and aversion with awareness, there is a radical shift of identity. These states are not who we really are. They are conditioned and impersonal, and they do not belong to us. It is scary to us and to those with whom we are locked in conflict when we release our blame. Sometimes our partners are confused when we step out of the dance of anger. They too will be required to change. In letting go of contention we return to our true strength and nobility. In our hardships, we discover the courage not to succumb, not to retreat, not to strike out in fear and anger. And by resting in a non-contentious heart we become a lamp, a medicine, a strong presence; we become the healing the world so dearly needs.

– Jack Kornfield

source: http://bit.ly/32U3IRk

Jack Kornfield on the web:
http://jackkornfield.com

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Reacting with anger

When someone insults us, we usually dwell on it, asking ourselves, ‘Why did he say that to me?’ and on and on. It’s as if someone shoots an arrow at us, but it falls short. Focusing on the problem is like picking up the arrow and repeatedly stabbing ourselves with it, saying, ‘He hurt me so much. I can’t believe he did that.’ Instead, we can use the method of contemplation to think things through differently, to change our habit of reacting with anger. Imagine that someone insults you. Say to yourself, ‘This person makes me angry. But what is this anger?’ It is one of the poisons of the mind that creates negative karma, leading to intense suffering. Meeting anger with anger is like following a lunatic who jumps off a cliff. Do I have to go likewise? While it’s crazy for him to act the way he does, it’s even crazier for me to do the same.

– Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche

quoted in the book “Portraits of Tibetan Buddhist Masters”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Hatred as enemy

Hatred is compared to an enemy. This internal enemy, this inner enemy, has no other function than causing us harm. It is our true enemy, our ultimate enemy. It has no other function than simply destroying us, both in the immediate term and in the long term.

– 14th Dalai Lama

from the book “Healing Anger: The Power Of Patience From A Buddhist Perspective”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Whenever the mind is happy or sad, don’t fall for it. Its all a deception

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“Whenever the mind is happy or sad, don’t fall for it. It’s all a deception.”
~ Ajahn Chah


The knack of refraining

Many of our escapes are involuntary: addiction and dissociating from painful feelings are two examples. Anyone who has worked with a strong addiction—compulsive eating, compulsive sex, abuse of substances, explosive anger, or any other behavior that’s out of control—knows that when the urge comes on it’s irresistible. The seduction is too strong. So we train again and again in less highly charged situations in which the urge is present but not so overwhelming. By training with everyday irritations, we develop the knack of refraining when the going gets rough. It takes patience and an understanding of how we’re hurting ourselves not to continue taking the same old escape route of speaking or acting out.

– Pema Chödron

from the book “Living Beautifully with Uncertainty and Change”

With thanks to  Just Dharma Quotes

The three fires of destruction

A Meditative Life – The Saddhamma of Gotama the Buddha


Anger

Source: Anger | Great Middle Way

greatmiddleway.wordpress.com

by

Jan 10, 2019

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What is anger? It is a vindictive attitude towards sentient beings, towards frustration, and towards that which gives rise to frustration.

Its function is to serve as a basis for faultfinding and for never attaining even a moment of happiness.

Arya Asanga


When we get angry, we suffer

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“When we get angry, we suffer. If you really understand that, you also will be able to understand that when the other person is angry, it means that she is suffering. When someone insults you or behaves violently towards you, you have to be intelligent enough to see that the person suffers from his own violence and anger. But we tend to forget. We think that we are the only one that suffers, and the other person is our oppressor. This is enough to make anger arise, and to strengthen our desire to punish. We want to punish the other person because we suffer. Then, we have anger in us; we have violence in us, just as they do. When we see that our suffering and anger are no different from their suffering and anger, we will behave more compassionately. So understanding the other is understanding yourself, and understanding yourself is understanding the other person. Everything must begin with you.”

~ Thich Nhat Hanh

ॐ Buddha Island ॐ


Anger, patience, and 100 days of sorrow

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Buddhism


Blindness

greatmiddleway.wordpress.com
Oct 4, 2018

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When angry, we do not know what is good for us;

when angry, we do not see the Dharma.

When anger overcomes us,

we dwell in blind darkness.

—Buddha Shakyamuni, Gandhari Dharmapada