The journey of a 1000 miles begins with a single step

Anger

We all have inner demons to fight


A monk on a boat story

A monk decided to meditate alone, away from his monastery. He took his boat out to the middle of the lake, moored it there, closed his eyes and began meditating. After a few hours of undisturbed silence, he suddenly felt the bump of another boat colliding with his own.
With his eyes still closed, he felt his anger rising, and by the time he opened his eyes, he was ready to scream at the boatman who had so carelessly disturbed his meditation. But when he opened his eyes, he was surprised to find that it was an empty boat that had struck his own. It had probably gotten untethered and floated to the middle of the lake.
At that moment, the monk had a great realization. He understood that the anger was within him; it merely needed the bump of an external object to provoke it out of him. From then on, whenever he came across someone who irritated him or provoked him to anger, he would remind himself, that the other person was merely an empty boat, the anger was within him.

Jim Hickey

[Photo: National Geographic]


Reacting with anger

When someone insults us, we usually dwell on it, asking ourselves, ‘Why did he say that to me?’ and on and on. It’s as if someone shoots an arrow at us, but it falls short. Focusing on the problem is like picking up the arrow and repeatedly stabbing ourselves with it, saying, ‘He hurt me so much. I can’t believe he did that.’ Instead, we can use the method of contemplation to think things through differently, to change our habit of reacting with anger. Imagine that someone insults you. Say to yourself, ‘This person makes me angry. But what is this anger?’ It is one of the poisons of the mind that creates negative karma, leading to intense suffering. Meeting anger with anger is like following a lunatic who jumps off a cliff. Do I have to go likewise? While it’s crazy for him to act the way he does, it’s even crazier for me to do the same.

– Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche

quoted in the book “Portraits of Tibetan Buddhist Masters”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


The young angry man and the Buddha

Always Question Everything


The courage not to succumb

When we examine anger and aversion with awareness, there is a radical shift of identity. These states are not who we really are. They are conditioned and impersonal, and they do not belong to us. It is scary to us and to those with whom we are locked in conflict when we release our blame. Sometimes our partners are confused when we step out of the dance of anger. They too will be required to change. In letting go of contention we return to our true strength and nobility. In our hardships, we discover the courage not to succumb, not to retreat, not to strike out in fear and anger. And by resting in a non-contentious heart we become a lamp, a medicine, a strong presence; we become the healing the world so dearly needs.

– Jack Kornfield

source: http://bit.ly/32U3IRk

Jack Kornfield on the web:
http://jackkornfield.com

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Reacting with anger

When someone insults us, we usually dwell on it, asking ourselves, ‘Why did he say that to me?’ and on and on. It’s as if someone shoots an arrow at us, but it falls short. Focusing on the problem is like picking up the arrow and repeatedly stabbing ourselves with it, saying, ‘He hurt me so much. I can’t believe he did that.’ Instead, we can use the method of contemplation to think things through differently, to change our habit of reacting with anger. Imagine that someone insults you. Say to yourself, ‘This person makes me angry. But what is this anger?’ It is one of the poisons of the mind that creates negative karma, leading to intense suffering. Meeting anger with anger is like following a lunatic who jumps off a cliff. Do I have to go likewise? While it’s crazy for him to act the way he does, it’s even crazier for me to do the same.

– Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche

quoted in the book “Portraits of Tibetan Buddhist Masters”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Hatred as enemy

Hatred is compared to an enemy. This internal enemy, this inner enemy, has no other function than causing us harm. It is our true enemy, our ultimate enemy. It has no other function than simply destroying us, both in the immediate term and in the long term.

– 14th Dalai Lama

from the book “Healing Anger: The Power Of Patience From A Buddhist Perspective”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Whenever the mind is happy or sad, don’t fall for it. Its all a deception

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“Whenever the mind is happy or sad, don’t fall for it. It’s all a deception.”
~ Ajahn Chah


The knack of refraining

Many of our escapes are involuntary: addiction and dissociating from painful feelings are two examples. Anyone who has worked with a strong addiction—compulsive eating, compulsive sex, abuse of substances, explosive anger, or any other behavior that’s out of control—knows that when the urge comes on it’s irresistible. The seduction is too strong. So we train again and again in less highly charged situations in which the urge is present but not so overwhelming. By training with everyday irritations, we develop the knack of refraining when the going gets rough. It takes patience and an understanding of how we’re hurting ourselves not to continue taking the same old escape route of speaking or acting out.

– Pema Chödron

from the book “Living Beautifully with Uncertainty and Change”

With thanks to  Just Dharma Quotes

The three fires of destruction

A Meditative Life – The Saddhamma of Gotama the Buddha


Anger

Source: Anger | Great Middle Way

greatmiddleway.wordpress.com

by

Jan 10, 2019

asanga_11969th

What is anger? It is a vindictive attitude towards sentient beings, towards frustration, and towards that which gives rise to frustration.

Its function is to serve as a basis for faultfinding and for never attaining even a moment of happiness.

Arya Asanga


When we get angry, we suffer

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“When we get angry, we suffer. If you really understand that, you also will be able to understand that when the other person is angry, it means that she is suffering. When someone insults you or behaves violently towards you, you have to be intelligent enough to see that the person suffers from his own violence and anger. But we tend to forget. We think that we are the only one that suffers, and the other person is our oppressor. This is enough to make anger arise, and to strengthen our desire to punish. We want to punish the other person because we suffer. Then, we have anger in us; we have violence in us, just as they do. When we see that our suffering and anger are no different from their suffering and anger, we will behave more compassionately. So understanding the other is understanding yourself, and understanding yourself is understanding the other person. Everything must begin with you.”

~ Thich Nhat Hanh

ॐ Buddha Island ॐ


Anger, patience, and 100 days of sorrow

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Buddhism


Blindness

greatmiddleway.wordpress.com
Oct 4, 2018

Gandhara_Buddha_(tnm)

When angry, we do not know what is good for us;

when angry, we do not see the Dharma.

When anger overcomes us,

we dwell in blind darkness.

—Buddha Shakyamuni, Gandhari Dharmapada


When anger arises

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Thich Nhat Hanh Philosophy & Practice


The country of Dharma

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My father is wisdom and my mother is voidness.
My country is the country of Dharma.
I am of no caste and no creed.
I am sustained by perplexity;
And I am here to destroy lust, anger and sloth.

– Padmasambhava

Just Dharma Quotes


Foes

greatmiddleway.wordpress.com

by

July 16, 2018

Related image

Although you may spend your life killing,

you will not exhaust all your foes.

But if you quell your own anger,

your real enemy will be slain.

—Arya Nagarjuna


Punishment and anger

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Kindness of your enemy

Never get angry, even with someone who has deliberately and maliciously harmed you. You should be grateful to such a person for helping you to purify past negative actions, to increase your determination to be free from samsara and to develop love and compassion.

– Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

from the book “The Heart of Compassion: The Thirty-seven Verses on the Practice of a Bodhisattva”

Just Dharma Quotes

Feeling anger

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Tao & Zen


Meeting someone you don’t like

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New Growth Awareness and Spirituality Group


Empty boats

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Sufi Story 💞

~
A monk decided to meditate alone, away from his monastery. He took his boat out to the middle of the lake, moored it there, closed his eyes and began meditating. After a few hours of undisturbed silence, he suddenly felt the bump of another boat colliding with his own.
With his eyes still closed, he felt his anger rising, and by the time he opened his eyes, he was ready to scream at the boatman who had so carelessly disturbed his meditation. But when he opened his eyes, he was surprised to find that it was an empty boat that had struck his own. It had probably gotten untethered and floated to the middle of the lake.
At that moment, the monk had a great realization. He understood that the anger was within him; it merely needed the bump of an external object to provoke it out of him. From then on, whenever he came across someone who irritated him or provoked him to anger, he would remind himself, that the other person was merely an empty boat, the anger was within him.


How a Zen Master recommends you respond to toxic people

In reaction to a post on Reddit, here is a wise piece of advice on how to deal with these kinds of people (toxic):
“The deeper your present moment peace gets, the easier it’ll be to react non- passionately when confronted with hostility. As this gets better, you can begin to realize more deeply just how much someone has to be suffering internally in order to have such harsh reactions. With enough insight, you can develop your empathy and compassion based off this knowledge and these also help you remain even more peaceful in the present moment.

Continue the conversation. Eventually, with enough compassion and insight on your side, you can begin to extinguish the fires of hostility by extinguishing anger with patience and understanding… It’s hard to continue treating someone harshly when they continue treating you well. In helping them relieve these feelings, you not only help them but you also help yourself, since you no longer have to deal with them as they were.”

source: thepowerofideas,

via: hackspirit


Anger

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White Clouds Sangha
There was a young boy who used to come to Plum Village every summer with his little sister. Every time he fell over and hurt himself, instead of coming to help him, his father would shout at him. The boy vowed that when he grew up, he would never be like his father. He vowed that if he ever had children and one of them fell down and hurt themself, he wouldn’t shout at them; he would try to help them. That was his firm determination. Then one summer when they were at Plum Village, the little boy’s younger sister was playing with another girl on a hammock, when the hammock broke. She fell and her knee was bleeding. The boy found himself becoming very angry, and he just wanted to yell: “It’s your own fault! How could you be so stupid?” Because he had been practicing simply noticing his feelings, without acting them out, he stopped himself from shouting. Instead, he turned around and practiced slow walking.
As he walked, he recognized that the energy of anger he was feeling had been transmitted to him by his father. If he didn’t practice breathing mindfully and sitting calmly and peacefully, he was going to become exactly like his father. In Sanskrit this is called samsara, the habitual continuation of negative or destructive behavior. The boy had a sudden urge to go home and invite his father to practice sitting meditation with him. When that good intention arose in him, all his anger and resentment toward his father began to dissolve. The boy was only twelve years old. For a person of any age, but particularly for a twelve-year-old, it is a remarkable achievement to have an insight that transforms our afflictions. If he is capable of it, we certainly are as well.
~ Thich Nhat Hanh