The journey of a 1000 miles begins with a single step

Compassion

Remember

greatmiddleway.wordpress.com
Oct , 2018

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An intelligent person does not blame someone whose mind is always helplessly victimized by faults.

Thinking, “this person’s wrongful conduct is involuntary,” her mercy increases.

—Maitreya, Mahayanasutralamkara

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Close both eyes, see with the other one

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“Close both eyes, see with the other one. Then we are no longer saddled by the burden of our persistent judgments, our ceaseless withholding, our constant exclusion. Our sphere has widened and we find ourselves quite unexpectedly in a new expansive location, in a place of Endless Acceptance and Infinite Love.”

~ Gregory Boyle ~

 

Bodhisattva Guan Yin

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Guanyin or Guan Yin ~ Perceiving the Sounds of the World.
She’s listening is an East Asian bodhisattva associated with compassion and venerated by Mahayana Buddhists and followers of Chinese folk religions, also known as the “Goddess of Mercy” in English. The Chinese name Guanyin, short for Guanshiyin, means “(The One Who) Perceives the Sounds of the World.”


Some Buddhists believe that when one of their adherents departs from this world, they are placed by Guanyin in the heart of a lotus, and then sent to the western Pure Land of Sukhāvatī.[3] Guanyin is often referred to as the “most widely beloved Buddhist Divinity” with miraculous powers to assist all those who pray to her, as is said in the Lotus Sutra and Karandavyuha Sutra.


Compassion for everyone

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Sacred Art Works


The roots of Buddhist practice

Humans are set apart from other types of sentient beings by their ability to naturally connect with sharp intelligence and with nonviolence, loving-kindness, and compassion. From the moment we are born, we are constantly chasing after happiness, thinking of ways we can become happy and free from suffering, and we actively try to bring those desires to fruition. The propensities toward loving-kindness, compassion, and nonviolence we display in following this quest for happiness demonstrate what makes human beings unique.

For any species of sentient being to continue existing, the members of that species must have affection for each other and they must support each other. In order for our human community to survive, we must nurture and sustain connections of love, compassion, nonviolence, and altruism. These connections are what will allow us not only to survive, but to make our lives meaningful. If we concentrate on ensuring that these connections are present, that in itself will be enough.

All of the Buddha’s teachings are based on refraining from harming others and engaging in helping others. It is therefore of great importance for Buddhists to have these two principles as the ground of their practice. The roots of Buddhist practice are the attitudes of altruism and non-harm. In other words, the roots of Buddhist practice are loving-kindness and compassion.

– 17th Karmapa

source: http://bit.ly/2GG2rG1

 


Compassion is a relationship between equals

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Lisa Easterling


All Aims

greatmiddleway.wordpress.com
March 7, 2018

518dc4d28a72ee53290e079bb2da4f2fFrom generosity comes wealth;

happiness from ethical conduct.

From patience comes beauty;

splendor from joyous effort.

Through concentration comes peace;

from wisdom comes liberation.

Compassion accomplishes all aims.

—Nagarjuna, Precious Garland


Cultivating Compassion

 

 Compassion practice is daring. It involves learning to relax and allowing ourselves to move gently toward what scares us. The trick to doing this is to stay with emotional distress without tightening into aversion; to let fear soften us rather than harden into resistance. We cultivate bravery through making aspirations. We make the wish that all beings, including ourselves and those we dislike, be free of suffering and the root of suffering.

– Pema Chödron


Defense to hatred and violence

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 “Developing the nectar of compassion in our own heart is the only effective spiritual response to hatred and violence.”

– Thich Nhat Hanh


How a Zen Master recommends you respond to toxic people

In reaction to a post on Reddit, here is a wise piece of advice on how to deal with these kinds of people (toxic):
“The deeper your present moment peace gets, the easier it’ll be to react non- passionately when confronted with hostility. As this gets better, you can begin to realize more deeply just how much someone has to be suffering internally in order to have such harsh reactions. With enough insight, you can develop your empathy and compassion based off this knowledge and these also help you remain even more peaceful in the present moment.

Continue the conversation. Eventually, with enough compassion and insight on your side, you can begin to extinguish the fires of hostility by extinguishing anger with patience and understanding… It’s hard to continue treating someone harshly when they continue treating you well. In helping them relieve these feelings, you not only help them but you also help yourself, since you no longer have to deal with them as they were.”

source: thepowerofideas,

via: hackspirit