The journey of a 1000 miles begins with a single step

Compassion

When someone hurts us

Image may contain: 1 person, text that says '"When another person makes you suffer, it is because he suffers deeply within himself, and his suffering is spilling over. does not need he needs help. That's the message he is sending. -Thich Nhat Hanh'

Tao & Zen


 Time is always moving on, nothing can stop it

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 Time is always moving on; nothing can stop it. We can’t change the past, but we can shape the future. The more compassionate you are, the more you will find inner peace.

Compassion and suffering

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To develop compassion in ourselves, we need to practice mindful breathing, deep listening, and deep looking… Compassion contains deep concern. You know the other person is suffering, so you sit close to her. You look and listen deeply to her to be able to touch her pain. You are in deep communication, deep communion with her, and that alone brings some relief.

– Thich Nhat Hanh
Painting: © Anna Silivonchik

Two kinds of suffering

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It can be said that there are two kinds of suffering. Perhaps ninety-five percent of the suffering we endure every day is not at all necessary. Because of our lack of insight, we cause suffering to ourselves and others, including our beloved ones. But the remaining five percent is born out of contact with the real suffering around us and inside of us. To be aware of this kind of suffering brings about compassion, the energy necessary to transform ourselves and help relieve the suffering of the world.

– Thich Nhat Hanh
Painting: © Picasso


Remember

greatmiddleway.wordpress.com
Oct , 2018

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An intelligent person does not blame someone whose mind is always helplessly victimized by faults.

Thinking, “this person’s wrongful conduct is involuntary,” her mercy increases.

—Maitreya, Mahayanasutralamkara


Close both eyes, see with the other one

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“Close both eyes, see with the other one. Then we are no longer saddled by the burden of our persistent judgments, our ceaseless withholding, our constant exclusion. Our sphere has widened and we find ourselves quite unexpectedly in a new expansive location, in a place of Endless Acceptance and Infinite Love.”

~ Gregory Boyle ~

 

Bodhisattva Guan Yin

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Guanyin or Guan Yin ~ Perceiving the Sounds of the World.
She’s listening is an East Asian bodhisattva associated with compassion and venerated by Mahayana Buddhists and followers of Chinese folk religions, also known as the “Goddess of Mercy” in English. The Chinese name Guanyin, short for Guanshiyin, means “(The One Who) Perceives the Sounds of the World.”


Some Buddhists believe that when one of their adherents departs from this world, they are placed by Guanyin in the heart of a lotus, and then sent to the western Pure Land of Sukhāvatī.[3] Guanyin is often referred to as the “most widely beloved Buddhist Divinity” with miraculous powers to assist all those who pray to her, as is said in the Lotus Sutra and Karandavyuha Sutra.


Compassion for everyone

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Sacred Art Works


The roots of Buddhist practice

Humans are set apart from other types of sentient beings by their ability to naturally connect with sharp intelligence and with nonviolence, loving-kindness, and compassion. From the moment we are born, we are constantly chasing after happiness, thinking of ways we can become happy and free from suffering, and we actively try to bring those desires to fruition. The propensities toward loving-kindness, compassion, and nonviolence we display in following this quest for happiness demonstrate what makes human beings unique.

For any species of sentient being to continue existing, the members of that species must have affection for each other and they must support each other. In order for our human community to survive, we must nurture and sustain connections of love, compassion, nonviolence, and altruism. These connections are what will allow us not only to survive, but to make our lives meaningful. If we concentrate on ensuring that these connections are present, that in itself will be enough.

All of the Buddha’s teachings are based on refraining from harming others and engaging in helping others. It is therefore of great importance for Buddhists to have these two principles as the ground of their practice. The roots of Buddhist practice are the attitudes of altruism and non-harm. In other words, the roots of Buddhist practice are loving-kindness and compassion.

– 17th Karmapa

source: http://bit.ly/2GG2rG1

 


Compassion is a relationship between equals

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Lisa Easterling