The journey of a 1000 miles begins with a single step

Tibetan Buddhism

Meditating by doing nothing


Signs of Practice

Calm and self-control are signs of listening to the Dharma;
Few passions, signs of meditation;
Harmony with everyone is the sign of a practitioner;
Your mind at ease, the sign of accomplishment.
– Dudjom Rinpoche
from the book “Wisdom Nectar: Dudjom Rinpoche’s Heart Advice”
With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes

Life is like last night’s dream

Life is like last night’s dream. Don’t hold on to it as too solid or inherently existent. The following advice on practice is given with the intention of making your life—this most precious human life that you have received just this once—as meaningful as possible. In the past, you have sacrificed your life and died numberless times creating the cause of suffering in samsara but have almost never sacrificed your life for the sake of Dharma, especially trying to bring other sentient beings to enlightenment. So, do as much of what follows as you can, and don’t worry—be happy.

Lama Zopa Rinpoche

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Source

http://www.lamayeshe.com


Thoughts, as writing on water

The Tibetans sometimes describe thoughts as writing on water, in essence empty, unsubstantial, and transient

Jon Kabbat-Zinn


The trouble maker

The particular thing that has created the problems of life is the dissatisfied mind of desire, which clings first of all to this life, seeking only the temporary happiness of this life, and then to these eight objects: having comfort, not having discomfort, receiving materials (such as friends and so forth), not liking not to receive materials, having a good reputation, not having a reputation, receiving praise, not having criticism. The dissatisfied mind of desire clings to these eight objects.

– Lama Zopa Rinpoche

Gems of Wisdom – Geluk Tradition


Our true enemy

Hatred is compared to an enemy. This internal enemy, this inner enemy, has no other function than causing us harm. It is our true enemy, our ultimate enemy. It has no other function than simply destroying us, both in the immediate term and in the long term.

– 14th Dalai Lama

from the book “Healing Anger: The Power Of Patience From A Buddhist Perspective”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


We are completely crazy

From morning to night we do everything with the self-cherishing mind. Inside the house, outside the house, getting dressed, walking around, talking to people, working, eating, seeing things, shopping, going to bed—we do everything with self-cherishing.

Even though everything we do is motivated by the wish to obtain temporal happiness and avoid temporal problems, in fact, everything we do creates the cause of greater, continual suffering in the future. For countless previous lifetimes, we’ve been carrying on like this, perpetuating the cycle of suffering, living fulltime with the thought of the eight worldly dharmas.

Unless we can break this cycle we will continue like this, doing the same thing on and on endlessly, because we’re using entirely the wrong methods to deal with our immediate worldly problems. We’re forever creating the causes for much greater suffering for ourselves. Really, we are crazy; completely crazy.

– Lama Zopa Rinpoche

source: http://www.lamayeshe.com/index.php…

Gems of Wisdom – Geluk TraditionLike Page


Intention

Even within Buddhism, there are various descriptions of this, but in the Mahayana tradition it [is] taught that the main criterion for an action being virtuous or non-virtuous is whether one’s intention is or is not virtuous. If you hold the motivation in your mind to be of benefit to others and that they may come to enjoy temporary and ultimate happiness and well-being, whatever actions of body, speech, and mind you may perform, they will all be on the side of virtue. But if you act with a negative mindset, out of a motivation that is afflicted by being jealous, malicious, competitive, and so on toward others, whatever you do will be non-virtuous. In brief, whether an action is considered as virtuous or non-virtuous depends mainly upon the underlying motivation or mindset either positive or negative. The results of good actions will also be good, while the outcomes of bad actions will be negative and painful.

– 17th Karmapa

from the book “Heart Advice of the Karmapa”


Fooled by appearance

 

If we recognize the unchanging, absolute nature of phenomena, we will also recognize their intangibility. Things appear yet are empty; they are empty yet appear. Emptiness is not the absence of phenomena, and phenomena are not the absence of emptiness. Rather, there is a union of appearance and emptiness. Just having a glimpse of understanding that things are not as they appear is already a big step toward seeing the true nature of things. We are like a naïve child who is easily fooled by appearances until we gain this understanding. In our confusion, we treat the phenomenal world as solid and real. We do not see that it is merely an expression of wisdom and the display of emptiness. We reify phenomena and this sets in motion an unending succession of attractions and aversions that lead to craving and desire. This one mistake, solidifying phenomena, gives rise to the endless cycle of samsara.

– Shechen Rabjam Rinpoche

from the book “The Great Medicine That Conquers Clinging to the Notion of Reality: Steps in Meditation on the Enlightened Mind”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Just another concept

But it can happen that a phrase intended to indicate a state beyond concepts just becomes another concept in itself, in the same way that if you ask a person their name and they reply that they have no name, you will then perhaps mistakenly call them ‘No name’.

Namkhai Norbu Rinpoche


Song of Samsara

File:Yama and Yami Eastern Tibet, Kham region, circa 1675-1725 ...

When you are young and vigorous
You never think of old age coming,
But it approaches slow and sure
Like a seed growing underground.
When you are strong and healthy
You never think of sickness coming,
But it descends with sudden force
Like a stroke of lightning.
When involved in worldly things
You never think of death’s approach.
Quick it comes like thunder
Crashing round your head.
Sickness, old age and death
Ever meet each other
As do hands and mouth.
Waiting for his prey in ambush,
Yama is ready for his victim,
When disaster catches him.
Sparrows fly in single file. Like them,
Life, Death and Bardo follow one another.
Never apart from you
Are these three ‘visitors’.
Thus thinking, fear you not
Your sinful deeds?
Like strong arrows in ambush waiting,
Rebirth in Hell, as Hungry Ghost, or Beast
Is (the destiny) waiting to catch you.
If once into their traps you fall,
Hard will you find it to escape.
Do you not fear the miseries
You experienced in the past?
Surely you will feel much pain
If misfortunes attack you?
The woes of life succeed one another
Like the sea’s incessant waves
One has barely passed, before
The next one takes its place.
Until you are liberated, pain
and pleasure come and go at random
Like passers-by encountered in the street.
Pleasures are precarious,
Like bathing in the sun;
Transient, too, as snowstorms
Which come without warning.
Remembering these things,
Why not practise the Dharma?

Milarepa

 

from the book The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa, Vol. 2

translated by Garma C. C. Chang

Song of Samsara ~ Milarepa


Kundan, a film about the Dalai Lama

Martin Scorcese did this film in 1997 about the life of the Dalai Lama

 


Tibetan Book of the Dead Quotes

It has been said that the Egyptian Book of the Dead and the Tibetan Book of the dead come from the same source of understanding.

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*Remember the clear light, the pure clear white light from which everything in the universe comes, to which everything in the universe returns; the original nature of your own mind. The natural state of the universe unmanifest. Let go into the clear light, trust it, merge with it. It is your own true nature, it is home.
*“O, [you], with your mind far away, thinking that death will not come, Entranced by the pointless activities of this life, If you were to return empty-handed now, would not your [life’s] purpose have been [utterly] confused? Recognize what it is that you truly need! It is a sacred teaching [for liberation]! So, should you not practice this divine [sacred] teaching, beginning from this very moment?”
*“Abandon your notions of the past, without attributing a temporal sequence! Cut off your mental associations regarding the future, without anticipation! Rest in a spacious modality, without clinging to [the thoughts of] the present. Do not meditate at all, since there is nothing upon which to meditate. Instead, the revelation will come through undistracted mindfulness — Since there is nothing by which you can be distracted.”
*“The nature of the mind, which is all-knowing, aware of everything, empty and radiant, is established to be the manifestly radiant and self-originating pristine cognition, present from the beginning, just like the sky…”

Merely discovered

 

Anything that is created must sooner or later die. Enlightenment is permanent because we have not produced it; we have merely discovered it.

– Chögyam Trungpa

from the book “Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Rather than being trapped by your perceptions

We are naturally attached to comfort and pleasure and bothered by physical and mental suffering. These innate tendencies lead us to seek out, maintain and try to increase whatever gives us pleasure comfortable clothing, delicious food, agreeable places, sensual pleasure – and to avoid or destroy whatever we find unpleasant or painful. Constantly changing and devoid of any true essence, these sensations rest on the ephemeral association of the mind with the body, and it is useless to be attached to them. Rather than being dragged along and trapped by your perceptions, just let them dissolve as soon as they form, like letters traced on the surface of water with your finger disappearing as you draw them.

– Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

from the book “The Hundred Verses of Advice: Tibetan Buddhist Teachings on What Matters Most”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


When building a house, you must begin with the foundation

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When building a house, you must begin with the foundation. Without it, the house will fall down. Likewise, to practice the highest teachings of tantra, you must have the foundation of renunciation, bodhicitta, and right view. Without it, no matter how much tantra that you think you are practicing, it would be like trying to build a house on ice.

~ Chamtrul Rinpoche

Renunciation is the determination to be free from samsara (uncontrollably recurring rebirth).

Bodhicitta is the compassionate wish to attain the enlightened state of a buddha for the benefit of all sentient beings.

Right view is the right understanding of reality (the emptiness of self and all phenomena).

Chamtrul Rinpoche


Like molding dough

Like molding dough in your hand, you can definitely turn your mind whichever way you want.

– Lama Zopa Rinpoche

from the book “The Door to Satisfaction: The Heart Advice of a Tibetan Buddhist Master”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes

Life just is

Life on the practical level does not contain any subtle philosophy or subtle mystical experience. It just is. If we are able to see that isness, so to speak, then there is a sense of realization. We experience sudden enlightenment. Without a sense of hopelessness, there is no way to give birth to sudden enlightenment. Only giving up our projects brings about the ultimate, definite, positive state of being, which is the realization that we are already enlightened beings here and now.

– Chögyam Trungpa

from the book “Crazy Wisdom”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes

Returning to that place where you started with

In terms of the nature of mind, the true nature of mind, I don’t know what I could say about that. It’s just there. Usually, we think of the true nature of mind as something really high, and although I haven’t done a lot of practice in relation to the true nature of mind, if I speak from my own experience of this, I could say that eventually we will return to what we were bored with in the beginning and discover that was it.

So we start off by thinking that what we have right now is too simple, too ordinary. The true nature of mind must be something special, something high, something prettier than what we have now. And what we have now doesn’t really satisfy our desires, it’s not very attractive to us, but if you put some serious effort into your practice, then eventually I think that recognizing the true nature of mind means returning to that place where you started with — your boring unattractive, not new, not high, mental state — and actually recognize that it has been what you’re looking for.

– 17th Karmapa

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes

source: https://bit.ly/1swlNQH


Losing interest in children’s games

By understanding emptiness, you lose interest in all the trappings and beliefs that society builds up and tears down – political systems, science, and technology, global economy, free society, the United Nations. You become like an adult who is not so interested in children’s games.

– Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche

from the book “What Makes You Not a Buddhist”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Fuzzy curly things floating through the air

As we go through life, we accumulate layers of ideas about who we are and what we’re capable of achieving. As these layers accumulate, we tend to become increasingly rigid in our identification with certain views about ourselves and the world around us. Gradually, we lose our connection to the basic openness, clarity, and love that is the essence of our being. Our awareness is overwhelmed by hundreds of different thoughts, feelings, and sensations. Some we latch onto because they’re attractive fantasies or scary preoccupations; some we try to shove away because they’re too upsetting or because they distract us from whatever we’re trying to accomplish at the moment.

Instead of focusing on some of them and pushing away others, though, just look at them as feathers flying in the wind. The wind is your awareness, your inborn openness and clarity. Feathers — the thoughts, emotions, and physical sensations that pass through our awareness — are harmless. Some may be more attractive than others, some less attractive; but essentially they’re just feathers. Look at them as fuzzy, curly things floating through the air.

As you do so, you begin to identify with the awareness that is watching the feathers and allow yourself to be okay with whatever feathers happen to be flying at the time. You’re accepting them without latching on to them or trying to shove them away. This simple act of acceptance — which may only last a few seconds — offers a taste of that open space of essence love, an acceptance of the warmth that is your basic nature, the heart of your own being.

– Tsoknyi Rinpoche

from the book “Open Heart, Open Mind: Awakening the Power of Essence Love”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


No greater virtue

It is said that there is no greater evil than hatred and no greater virtue than patience. While a single moment of anger destroys countless aeons of merits and leads to unmitigated suffering in the hell realms, patience towards those who harm you and the sincere wish to bring them happiness will bring you swiftly onto the path taken by all the Buddhas.

There is no better way to deal with enemies than to feel great love for them, realizing that in former lives they have been your loving parents. There is no better way to nurture your family and look after others than to practice the Dharma and dedicate to all beings the merit you thereby obtain. There is no better or more bountiful harvest than the one you sow in the soil of your faith and endeavor so that it ripens into the richness of merit and wisdom.

– Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

from the book “The Heart Treasure of the Enlightened Ones”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


The cause of all these sufferings is our fundamental insecurity

The cause of all these sufferings is our fundamental insecurity. We are always wondering whether we exist or not. Our ego, or rather our attachment to the idea of self, is completely insecure about its own existence. Our ego may seem strong but it is actually quite shaky. Of course, we do not ask such questions consciously, but we always have a subconscious feeling of insecurity about whether we exist.

We try to use things such as friends, money, position, and power, and all the everyday things that we do, like watching television or going shopping, to somehow prove and confirm our existence. Try sitting alone in a house and doing absolutely nothing. Sooner or later your hands will reach for the remote control or the newspaper. We need to be occupied. We need to be busy. If we are not busy, we feel insecure.

But there is something very strange in all this. The ego searches constantly for distraction, and then the distraction itself becomes a problem. Instead of helping us to feel reassured, it actually increases our insecurity. We get obsessed with the distraction and it develops into another habit. Once it becomes a habit, it is difficult to get rid of. So in order to get rid of this new habit, we have to adopt yet another habit. This is how things go on and on.

– Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Not seeing thoughts as simple phenomena

When you relate to thoughts obsessively, you are actually feeding them because thoughts need your attention to survive. Once you begin to pay attention to them and categorize them, then they become very powerful. You are feeding them energy because you are not seeing them as simple phenomena. If one tries to quiet them down, that is another way of feeding them.

– Chögyam Trungpa

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes