The journey of a 1000 miles begins with a single step

Impermanence

The Wind of Impermanence

Source: The Wind of Impermanence | Great Middle Way

by

Sept 11, 2017

rennyoWill I die first, or will my neighbor? Will it be today or tomorrow? We do not know.

Those we leave behind and those who go before us are more numerous than the dew drops that rest briefly beneath the trees and on their leaf tips.

We may have radiant faces in the morning, but in the evening be no more than white bones.

With the coming of the wind of  impermanence, both eyes are instantly closed, and when a single breath is forever stilled, the radiant face is drained of life, and its vibrant glow is lost.

Although family and relatives may gather and grieve broken-heartedly, it is to no avail. As there is nothing else to be done, the once-familiar form is taken to an outlying field, and when it has vanished with the midnight smoke, nothing is left but white bones.

This is indeed indescribably sad.

—Rennyo Shonin

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Treat every moment as your last

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, sitting and indoor

“Treat every moment
as your last.
It is not preparation
for something else.

Where ever you are,
you are one with the clouds
and one with the sun
and the stars you see.
You are one with everything.
That is more true than I can say,
and more true than you can hear.”~Shunryu Suzuki
Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind


The Winds of Impermanence

Source: The Winds of Impermanence | Great Middle Way

greatmiddleway.wordpress.com

by

June 12, 2017

5bc2ec8bc05e151d8e68c7c20cae579fWill I die first, or will my neighbor?

Will it be today or tomorrow? We do not know.

Those we leave behind and those who go before us

are more numerous than the dewdrops

that rest briefly beneath the trees and on their leaf tips.

 

We may have radiant faces in the morning,

but in the evening be no more than white bones.

 

With the coming of the winds of impermanence,

both eyes are instantly closed,

and when a single breath is forever stilled,

the radiant face is drained of life,

and its vibrant glow is lost.

 

Although family and relatives may gather

and grieve broken-heartedly, it is to no avail.

As there is nothing else to be done,

the once-familiar form is taken to an outlying field,

and when it has vanished with the midnight smoke,

nothing is left but white bones.

 

This is indeed indescribably sad.

—Rennyo Shonin


This is How the World Will End, According to Buddha

Source: This is How the World Will End, According to Buddha | Humans Are Free

With permission from

humansarefree.com

June 12, 2017

The end time (also called end times, end of time, end of days, last days, final days, or eschaton) is a future time-period described variously in the eschatologies of several world religions which believe that world events will achieve a final climax. 

The Abrahamic faiths maintain a linear cosmology, with end-time scenarios containing themes of transformation and redemption.

In Judaism, the term “end of days” makes reference to the Messianic Age, and includes an in-gathering of the exiled Jewish diaspora, the coming of the Messiah, the resurrection of the righteous and the world to come.

Some sects of Christianity depict the world will come to an end through a series of cataclysmic events followed by resurrection of departed souls and judgment day.

According to Vedic tradition, Aditi is mother of eight Adityas or solar deities (suns). At the end of creation these eight suns will shine together in the skies.

In the following sermon, the Buddha speaks of how seven suns will appear in the sky and how the planet earth will eventually be destroyed, after many hundreds and thousands of years, through a series of cataclysmic events which are described below.

  • The earth will suffer from a severe drought due to lack of rains. All vegetation and life forms will disappear and vanish from the planet.
  • A second sun will appear in the horizon, resulting in the evaporation of many streams and ponds.
  • A third sun will appear resulting in the evaporation of many great rivers like the Ganges.
  • After a long lapse of time, a fourth sun will appear in the sky resulting in the evaporation of great lakes.
  • After another long lapse of time, a fifth sun will appear and the oceans will dry up slowly till they will become a finger deep.
  • After another long lapse of time, a sixth sun will appear. The earth crust and core will heat up to intense temperatures resulting in many volcanic explosions, scorched earth and smoke filled skies.
  • After another vast interval, a seventh sun will appear. The earth will become a fiery ball of flame and expand. Its flames will spread far and wide. Finally it will explode and disappear altogether.

The manner in which the Buddha predicted the end of the earth sounds very much like a modern scientific theory on the destruction of planets and the entire solar system.

The Buddha also clearly mentions that all life forms will vanish before the appearance of the second sun. Thereafter the earth will be a dead planet ready for its eventual destruction.

The seven suns mentioned in the discourse probably are various planets of the solar system that would become hot and shine like stars due to some changes in the activity of the sun or its gravitational force.

The manner in which the drying up of the planet earth is described reminds one of the greenhouse effect and the events that might have happened on planets like Mars which had once oceans and rivers and probably life forms.

The Buddha delivered this sermon to remind his disciples of the impermanent nature of the world and of our existence, which is subject to decay and renewal and from which even a god like Brahma is not free unless he overcomes it by practicing Dhamma and following the eight-fold path.

Sources: Simple Capacity, Wikipedia, BBN, The Wisdom Awakened 


Rhythms in life as natural events

 
“There are times to cultivate and create, when you nurture your world and give birth to new ideas and ventures. There are times of flourishing and abundance, when life feels in full bloom, energized and expanding. And there are times of fruition, when things come to an end. They have reached their climax and must be harvested before they begin to fade. And finally of course, there are times that are cold, and cutting and empty, times when the spring of new beginnings seems like a distant dream. Those rhythms in life are natural events. They weave into one another as day follows night, bringing, not messages of hope and fear, but messages of how things are.”
Chögyam Trungpa

Source: Chögyam Trungpa Quotes (Author of Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism)


The world is its own magic

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“The world is its own magic.”

― Shunryu Suzuki

Tao & Zen

 


3 Min Meditation: Slow Life