The journey of a 1000 miles begins with a single step

Universe

A Buddhist conception of the universe in an image

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Imagine a multidimensional web early in the morning, covered in dewdrops. And each dewdrop contains the reflection of all the other dew drops; and, in every reflected drop, the reflection of all the more dew drops…in this reflection. And so to infinity…
This is the Buddhist conception of the universe in an image.
Alan Watts

All the visible Universe is the Buddha

Image may contain: one or more people and outdoor, text that says 'Come to know the nature of your own Mind, in which there is no self and no no other... Huang Po'

“All the visible Universe is the Buddha; so are all sounds; hold fast to one principle and all the others are Identical. On seeing one thing, you see ALL. On perceiving any individual’s mind, you are perceiving ALL Mind.. When your glance falls upon a grain of dust, what you see is identical with all the vast world systems with their great rivers and mighty hills. To gaze upon a drop of water is to behold the nature of all the waters of the Universe. Only come to know the nature of your own Mind, in which there is no self and no other, and you will in fact be a Buddha.”

~Huang Po~

THE FRACTAL OF OM

No photo description available.

Tao & Zen Community Forum

THE FRACTAL OF OM

When the Hindu sacred syllable AUM is uttered it is a sound and meaning fractal. Although it is not a word, but just itself, OM. It is heard as OM, but is contains three Sanskrit parts, sounds that are nevertheless universal.

A is the natural sound that arises with the open human mouth without manipulating the lips or throat or tongue..the sound first heard from a newborn baby..AHHHH! AHHHHH! AHHHH!

It is the first letter of the Sanskrit English, Islamic, Greek, Roman, Hebrew and many other alphabets used by the human family.

Emitting this first sound and slowly bringing the open mouth to closed, the sound becomes UUUU, or phonetically OOOO. I don’t know enough of other alphabets but I know this is the last vowel U in English. When these two sounds come together they form the dipthong (two vowels sounded or elided, merged together as one) O, the sort of “middle” sound and position of the lips, that is heard as we say OM. I reflect on the synchronistic connection of the Alpha and the Omega of the Greek alphabet, the beginning and the end.

We see thus the symbol referred to as AUM, the correct written form of the sign OM. The OM symbol actually represents these both, the script and the way it is heard with the dipthong (two vowel-sounds sounded together) and the nasal MMM sound of the close. There are Jain, Tibetan and other script forms of OM also.

The culminating nasal MMMM sound of course is the other universal closed mouth sound of the human voice – the hum, a word that sounds like the sound itself .
Here, the syllable is brought together in harmony, to a unity, closing and embracing all the sounds, from beginning to end. The other sometimes overlooked part is the silence after and between the OMs when chanted. The chanting of the OM makes the very silence powerful too, with all its meanings. One thinks on these rich meanings after chanting or before, not during. There are other connections and meanings too, not mentioned here, even of Yin and Yang, Brahman, Tao. But when chanting one does not think, one gets lost….in the Universe.

OOOOOMMMMM….OOOOOMMMMM…OOOOOOMMMM….(108)

When chanted slowly and with resonance and even more with the background drone of the Indian Sitar or Tibetan sacred bowls or other resonating instruments or with other human voices, the effect of it reverberates through the whole body and head increasingly.

They say it is the sound of the Universe. Sure sounds like it.

Peace. OM. Namaste. _/\_

Tao & Zen Community Forum


On Buddhism and Quantum Theory

Read this one several times until fully understood:

Thought is the Creative Medium

The great Tibetan masters agreed that there are three equally valid means to enlightenment: Dzogchen, Mahamudra and Madhyamaka.

Madhyamaka is rarely appreciated regarding its potential benefit of total liberation. Most consider it a dry, incomprehensible, philosophical system, grounded in merely intellectual arguments and refutations.

Unfortunately, we can thank Tsongkhapa and the Gelugpa’s for this oft mistaken view regarding the “Middle Way”, in Sanskrit: Madhyamaka.

A much simpler understanding can be conveyed, and when fully digested, will produce complete liberation from the ignorance which is the cause of our suffering.

The bottom line understanding is this: the universe, the world, our bodies, our brains, our selves, other people, our interactions, our perceptions, our karmic mind and all physical objects as experienced; are conceptual constructions occurring in consciousness, and are of the single substance of “thought” or “consciousness”, or “mind” only.

A quick introduction into this perspective would be to initially understand that everything we perceive or experience are no more than fluctuating fields of atoms. The mind labels certain of these patterns of atoms as trees, people, planets and all things. The entire field of atoms is interconnected as a single universal field with no separate parts. The human mind conceives certain patches of perceptions are as “thought about”. There are no “people” in reality; only a fluctuating field of vibrating atoms that the mind defines as people, with all their thought-up characteristics. This is like the mind assigning the existence of a snake to a coil of rope in the dark. There is no “snake” there and there are no “people” either.

This isn’t nihilism because the field of fluctuating atoms exists (in our analogy) but has no inherent characteristics other than as the mind projects upon it; as the thoughts that define what a “person” is. The “person” is a made-up story, comprised only of thoughts superimposed upon an ever evolving and changing pattern of insubstantial atoms.

Now apply this insight to all things, creatures and people. It’s realized that the fluctuating field of atoms are “empty” of those defining “thought descriptions” which are its only specified or designated characteristics.

In reality there are no “people”, “persons” or “things”; there is only an impersonal field of atoms in fluctuation.

The early Buddhists believed in these primary “atoms” as taught in Abhidharma. Other Buddhist schools refuted even the existence of primary “atoms” as a material substrate, as did the Madhyamaka and Prasangika traditions. This view evolved into the “Consciousness Only” schools. They eliminated all “material” elements or substrates. The only Reality was immaterial Consciousness (shes pa) itself.

That means that our universe, world, bodies and lives are now seen as merely fluctuations of “thought”, not fluctuations of material “atoms”. This is the view of Madhyamaka and Prasangika “emptiness teachings”. This means all phenomena are “empty” of any kind of objectively existing, material substrate or substance; all is consciousness or mind only.

Does this view conflict with modern science and physics or is this also the current view of quantum mechanics?

This perspective is not possible if “classical Newtonian physics” is true. Therefore we have to upshift to the much more accurate view that “quantum mechanics” offers.

One of quantum physic’s founding fathers, Erwin Schroedinger, wrote:

“The world is given to me only once, not one existing and one perceived.”

Some supportive quotes from QM physicists:

“I regard consciousness as fundamental. I regard matter as derivative from consciousness. We cannot get behind consciousness. Everything that we talk about, everything that we regard as existing, postulates consciousness.”
― Max Planck, Father of Quantum Theory

“There is no matter as such. All matter originates and exists only by virtue of a force… We must assume behind this force the existence of a conscious and intelligent Mind. This Mind is the matrix of all matter.”
― Max Planck

“Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.”
― Albert Einstein

“The doctrine that the world is made up of objects whose existence is independent of human consciousness turns out to be in conflict with quantum mechanics and with facts established by experiment.”
― Physicist Bernard d’Espagnat

“It was not possible to formulate the laws of quantum mechanics in a fully consistent way without reference to the consciousness.”
― Physicist Eugene Wigner

“We have to give up the idea of realism to a far greater extent than most physicists believe today.”
― Physicist Anton Zeilinger

“Observations not only disturb what is to be measured, they produce it.”
― Physicist Pascual Jordan

“When we measure something we are forcing an undetermined, undefined world to assume an experimental value. We are not ‘measuring’ the world, we are creating it.”
― Niels Bohr

“The atoms or elementary particles themselves are not real; they form a world of potentialities or possibilities rather than one of things or facts.”
― Werner Heisenberg

“Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.”
― Niels Bohr.

“If quantum mechanics hasn’t profoundly shocked you, you haven’t understood it yet.”
― Niels Bohr

“The ontology of materialism rested upon the illusion that the kind of existence, the direct “actuality” of the world around us, can be extrapolated into the atomic range. This extrapolation is impossible, however.”
― Werner Heisenberg

“ ‘It from Bit’ symbolizes the idea that every item of the physical world has at bottom an immaterial source and explanation… that all things physical are information-theoretic in origin and that this is a participatory universe.”
― John Archibald Wheeler

“Consciousness is the phenomenon whereby the universe’s very existence is made known.”
― Roger Penrose

“Quantum physics thus reveals a basic oneness of the universe.”
― Erwin Schrodinger

“Deep down the consciousness of mankind is one. This is a virtual certainty because even in the vacuum matter is one; and if we don’t see this, it’s because we are blinding ourselves to it.”
― David Bohm

“If ordinary people really knew that consciousness and not matter is the link that connects us with each other and the world, then their views about war and peace, environmental pollution, social justice, religious values, and all other human endeavors would change radically.”
― physics professor, Amit Goswami, “The Quantum Activist”

Professor of Quantum Physics at John Hopkins University, Richard Conn Henry wrote:
THE REAL SCANDAL OF QUANTUM MECHANICS

“It seems that almost everyone feels that the universe must be “made of” something and wants to know what. We know for a fact that the universe is not “made of” anything. …. Get it through your heads, physicists! It is sometimes said that the only thing that is real are the observations, but even that is not true: observations are not real either. They, and everything else, are purely mental.”

He later states: “…. there are no real monkeys or cats or other humans––the entire universe exists only in YOUR mind.”

(Jackson: This is the actual implication that quantum mechanics reveals since 1925, and has continued to be verified as a completely accurate description of the universe at all levels. This happens to be identical to the Buddhist teachings known as Madhyamaka (Middle Way) as elucidated by Nagarjuna and later by Chandrakirti.

In the Madhyamaka teachings it is demonstrated logically that the universe and all its beings exist purely through conceptual designation alone. Outside of our mental constructions there is no universe and no beings at all. Quantum Physics and Buddhism agree completely on this vital
Insight.)

From another essay, physics Professor Conn Henry writes:

“One benefit of switching humanity to a correct perception of the world is the resulting joy of discovering the mental nature of the Universe. We have no idea what this mental nature implies, but — the great thing is — it is true. Beyond the acquisition of this perception, physics can no longer help. You may descend into solipsism, expand to deism, or something else if you can justify it — just don’t ask physics for help.”

“There is another benefit of seeing the world as quantum mechanical: someone who has learned to accept that nothing exists but observations (thoughts), is far ahead of peers who stumble through physics hoping to find out ‘what things are’. If we can ‘pull a Galileo,’ and get people believing the truth, they will find physics a breeze.
The Universe is immaterial — mental and spiritual. Live, and enjoy.”

Richard Conn Henry is a Professor in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland

Quantum physics can help us in deconstructing our incorrect views that assume an objective, material universe exists “out there”. Only Consciousness exists and our thoughts about it.

As harsh as it may sound, your children and yourselves, are merely fluctuations of “atoms” or believed thoughts; like everything else. Reality is not more than your thoughts, as momentary appearances of Consciousness.

Now that the “view” has been clarified; let’s look at some of the teachings of two great proponents of Madhysmaka, Nagarjuna and Chandrakirti:

The unborn nature ~ Chandrakirti

Right from the beginning, in the unborn nature
There is nothing to be refuted and nothing to be established.
At the level of the unborn, there is no distinction of
Attaining nirvana or not attaining nirvana.
The unborn nature itself is also not there,
Because there is no thing which is unborn.
There is no relative and no absolute.
There are no buddhas and no beings.
There is no view and nothing to meditate on.
There is no conduct and no result.
The mind is the meditation;
The mind free of concepts rests in its own place.
There is nothing that recognizes and nothing that is distracted.
There are no characteristics, and the meditation is very clear.

“Those who believe in validly established conventional reality assert that relative phenomena have objective existence; that they validly exist from their own side, by virtue of their own specific characteristics. Chandrakirti shows how this is not the case; he demonstrates that phenomena in relative reality have no valid, objective existence, but are merely conceptual projections, just like phenomena in dreams.”

From Chandrakirti’s Entering the Middle Way with Commentary from Karmapa VIII Mikyo Dorje
(translator’s introduction)

Nagarjuna wrote in “Praises”:

“Any horns there on a rabbit’s head are just imagined and do not exist. Just so, all phenomena as well are just imagined and do not exist.”

Chandrakirti’s Prasangika view, from his text:

“Prasannapada”

“It is established that through the cessation of karma and afflictive mental states comes liberation.

What, then, is that thing due to the cessation of which karma and afflictive states also cease?

We respond:
Karma and afflictive mental states come from conceptuality (vikalpa), and that comes from conceptual structuring (prapañca). Conceptual structuring, however, ceases in emptiness.
This is so because afflictive mental states such as desire arise in one who, as a childish, ordinary person, is improperly conceptualizing material form and so on.”

As Nāgārjuna will explain:
It is said that attachment, aversion, and confusion come from conceptuality because
they arise in dependence on the beautiful, the ugly, and error. (MMK 23.1)

And it is also said in a sūtra:

Desire (also maya), I know your root: you are born from conceptuality. No longer will I
conceptualize you, and thus, you will no longer be in me.

“In this manner, karma and afflictive mental states, first of all, come from concepts. And the concepts arise from various kinds of conceptual structuring to which one has become conditioned throughout one’s beginningless saṃsāric existence.”

“Those various kinds of conceptual structuring include: knowledge and the known object; linguistic referent and linguistic expression; agent, object, instrument and action;
material form and sensation; female and male; gain and loss; happiness and suffering; fame and obscurity; praise and blame; and so on. ”

“All of these worldly conceptual structures cease in emptiness; that is, they cease when one sees that all things are empty of essence. How so? Because the aforementioned web of conceptual structuring occurs [only] if one perceives a thing to be “real”.

Nagarjuna:
Peace is the calming of all perceptual objectification (sarvopalambhupaśama), the calming of conceptual structuring: no dharma has been taught by the Buddha for anyone anywhere.”

A modern master of Prasangika, Gen Lamrimpa explains:

“The entire universe and everything in it is conceptually designated.”

“We say that phenomena are established by the power of conceptual designation.”

“Since phenomena do not exist inherently, they must exist conventionally. And since phenomena are established by the power of convention, they exist in a dependent fashion. Phenomena are dependent upon something else; in particular, they are dependent upon conceptual designation.”

“There are a number of Buddhist scriptures that make this point. For example, there are sutras that say phenomena are established by conception. Also, Nagarjuna’s writings say that phenomena are established by thought, and Aryadeva makes the same point. All these Buddhist writings say that phenomena are established by convention, and what they mean here is that they are conceptually designated.”

“This is an assertion unique to the Prasangika Madhyamaka view. All four Buddhist philosophical systems affirm that phenomena are dependent upon the collection of their preceding causes and conditions. But apart from the Prasangika system, the other Buddhist philosophical systems do not assert that phenomena are established by conception. Advocates of those other systems are not able to comprehend this point.”

“Nagarjuna comments that total emptiness, or universal emptiness, remains upon the complete cessation of all appearances of conventional reality (conceptual constructs). In the absence of all conventional appearances (conceptual constructions), that emptiness can be called “the clear light of the fourth occasion.” The Buddhist scholar Sangye Yeshe states that this mind of clear light pervades all of space. This indicates the essential nature, or the mode of being, of the awareness (rigpa).”

“We can ask this question in relation to the “I.” How does the “I” exist? First of all, the “I” does not exist except as a conceptual or verbal designation. Apart from that, the “I” has no other mode of existence.”
(Translated from Tibetan by B. Allan Wallace)

Khenpo Tsulstrim Gyamtso:

“We can formulate the following logical reasoning: Karmic actions and results are mere appearances devoid of true existence, because no self, no actor, exists to perform them. This is a valid way to put things because if the self of the individual does not exist, there cannot be any action, and therefore there cannot be any result of any action either.”
Khenpo Tsulstrim Gyamtso

“Someone might ask, “Isn’t it nihilistic to think that karmic actions and their results do not exist?” In fact, this is not a nihilistic view because there exists no self to have any nihilistic view. There can be a nihilistic view only if there is someone to hold it, but since there is no one to have any view, then there can be no nihilism. Furthermore, since the thought of nihilism neither arises nor abides nor ceases, there can be no nihilism in genuine reality. Genuine reality transcends the conceptual fabrications of realism and nihilism. It transcends karmic actions and results, and the absence of karmic actions and results as well. If karmic actions and their results do not exist in the abiding nature of reality, then what is the quality of their appearance?”

Nagarjuna describes this in the chapter’s thirty-third verse:

“Mental afflictions, actions, and bodies, as well as actors and results, are like cities of imaginary beings, like mirages, and like dreams.”

“In the end, Madhyamaka refers to the actual direct experience of a nonreferential state of mind that is utterly free from all discursiveness obscuring the seeing of mind’s true nature. So when Madhyamakas talk about freedom from discursiveness, it means not only freedom from extreme or wrong ideas but complete absence of any coarse, subtle, conscious, or unconscious ideas, thoughts, or mental images whatsoever (obviously, this does not mean some kind of coma). At the most subtle level, this means to be free from even the most deeply ingrained tendencies within the mental flux of ordinary sentient beings, such as our instinctive “gut feeling” of being individuals who are different from others and the appearance of subject and object as being distinct.”
Karl Brunnholzl from his “Center of the Sunlit Sky”

Brain and Idealism:

https://youtu.be/pEXbZ3gIkAE

https://youtu.be/eehz5YKnBf4

Dzogchen teacher Alan Wallace:

https://youtu.be/xhaY0WuzROo


In All Chaos There is a Cosmos

Image may contain: night, possible text that says '"In all chaos there is a cosmos, in all disorder a secret order." Carl Jung-'

“In all chaos, there is a cosmos, in all disorder a secret order… We are living in what the Greeks called the right time for a “metamorphosis of the gods,” i.e. of the fundamental principles and symbols. This peculiarity of our time, which is certainly not of our conscious choosing, is the expression of the unconscious within us who is changing. Coming generations will have to take account of this momentous transformation if humanity is not to destroy itself through the might of its own technology and science..”


We are so addicted, either to materialism or to transcending material reality, that we don’t see the Universe right in front of us

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“We are so addicted, either to materialism or to transcending material reality, that we don’t see [the Universe] right in front of us, in the beggar, the starving child, the brokenhearted woman; in our friend; in the cat; in the flea. We miss it.

All mystical systems are addicted to transcending this reality. This addiction is part of the reason why the world is being destroyed. The monotheistic religions honor an off-planet God and would sacrifice this world and its attachments to the adoration of that God.

But the “God” I met was both immanent and transcendent. This world is not an illusion, and the philosophies that say it is are half-baked half-truths. In an authentic mystical experience, the world does disappear and reveal itself as the dance of the divine consciousness.

But then it reappears, and you see that everything you are looking at is God/Universe, and everything you’re touching is God/Universe. This vision completely shatters you.”

~Andrew Harvey

Artwork by Cameron Grey


How to alter the universe

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Rajit Sharma


Everything in the universe is created by our own mind

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Everything in the universe is created by our own mind. Our mind is the source of all phenomena. Form, sound, smell, taste, and tactile perception such as hot and cold, hard and soft—these are all creations of our mind. They do not exist as we usually think they do. Our consciousness is like an artist, painting every phenomenon into being. Once you have attained the state of the realm of no materiality, you will have succeeded. The realm of no materiality is the state in which we see that no phenomenon exists outside of our own mind.

– Thich Nhat Hanh, in “Old Path White Clouds: The Life Story of the Buddha”.
(Image: Celia Anahin)

Thich Nhat Hanh gems


Learn to see

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“Learn how to see,
realize that
everything connects
to everything else.”
~Leonardo Da Vinci~

The individual and the universe are inseparable

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“I seem, like everything else, to be a center, a sort of vortex, at which the whole energy of the universe realizes itself.. Each one of us, not only human beings but every leaf, every weed, exists in the way it does, only because everything else around it does. The individual and the universe are inseparable.”
~Alan Watts

Connected to the universe

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“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.” ~John Muir

Painting by Denis Nunez Rodriguez


The individual and the universe are inseparable

“I seem, like everything else, to be a center, a sort of vortex, at which the whole energy of the universe realizes itself.. Each one of us, not only human beings but every leaf, every weed, exists in the way it does, only because everything else around it does. The individual and the universe are inseparable.”

~Alan Watts


A flower is not a flower

A flower is not a flower. It is made only of non-flower elements — sunshine, clouds, time, space, earth, minerals, gardeners, and so on. A true flower contains the whole universe. If we return any one of these non-flower elements to its source, there will be no flower. That is why we can say, “A rose is not a rose. That is why it is an authentic rose.” We have to remove our concept of rose if we want to touch the real rose.

– Thich Nhat Hanh, in “The Heart of the Buddha’s Teaching”.
Photo: Bastien Riu

 

The universe is perceiving itself

Through our eyes, the universe is perceiving itself. Through our ears, the universe is listening to its harmonies. We are the witnesses through which the universe becomes conscious of its glory, of its magnificence.

Alan W. Watts

Photo: Earth Hues


The Wisdom of Albert Einstein

“Confucius, Buddha, Jesus and Gandhi have done more for humanity than science has done.”

Image may contain: 1 person, text

 “Religion and science go together. As I’ve said before, science without religion is lame and religion without science is blind. They are interdependent and have a common goal—the search for truth.

Hence it is absurd for religion to proscribe Galileo or Darwin or other scientists. And it is equally absurd when scientists say that there is no God. The real scientist has faith, which does not mean that he must subscribe to a creed.

Without religion there is no charity. The soul given to each of us is moved by the same living spirit that moves the universe.

The genuine scientist is not moved by praise or blame, nor does he preach. He unveils the universe and people come eagerly, without being pushed, to behold a new revelation: the order, the harmony, the magnificence of creation!

And as man becomes conscious of the stupendous laws that govern the universe in perfect harmony, he begins to realize how small he is. He sees the pettiness of human existence, with its ambitions and intrigues, its ‘I am better than thou’ creed.

This is the beginning of cosmic religion within him; fellowship and human service become his moral code. Without such moral foundations, we are hopelessly doomed.

If we want to improve the world we cannot do it with scientific knowledge but with ideals. Confucius, Buddha, Jesus and Gandhi have done more for humanity than science has done.

We must begin with the heart of man—with his conscience—and the values of conscience can only be manifested by selfless service to mankind.

I believe that we don’t need to worry about what happens after this life, as long as we do our duty here—to love and to serve.

I have faith in the universe, for it is rational. Law underlies each happening. And I have faith in my purpose here on earth. I have faith in my intuition, the language of my conscience, but I have no faith in speculation about Heaven and Hell. I’m concerned with this time—here and now.

Many people think that the progress of the human race is based on experiences of an empirical, critical nature, but I say that true knowledge is to be had only through a philosophy of deduction. For it is intuition that improves the world, not just following a trodden path of thought.

Intuition makes us look at unrelated facts and then think about them until they can all be brought under one law. To look for related facts means holding onto what one has instead of searching for new facts.

Intuition is the father of new knowledge, while empiricism is nothing but an accumulation of old knowledge. Intuition, not intellect, is the ‘open sesame’ of yourself.

Indeed, it is not intellect, but intuition which advances humanity. Intuition tells man his purpose in this life..”

~Albert Einstein

How Einstein Saw the World
https://creativesystemsthinking.wordpress.com/2014/02/16/how-einstein-saw-the-world/


True spirituality

True spirituality is to be aware that if we are interdependent with everything and everyone else, even our smallest, least significant thought, word and action have real consequences throughout the universe.


This is How the World Will End, According to Buddha

Source: This is How the World Will End, According to Buddha | Humans Are Free

With permission from

humansarefree.com

June 12, 2017

The end time (also called end times, end of time, end of days, last days, final days, or eschaton) is a future time-period described variously in the eschatologies of several world religions which believe that world events will achieve a final climax. 

The Abrahamic faiths maintain a linear cosmology, with end-time scenarios containing themes of transformation and redemption.

In Judaism, the term “end of days” makes reference to the Messianic Age, and includes an in-gathering of the exiled Jewish diaspora, the coming of the Messiah, the resurrection of the righteous and the world to come.

Some sects of Christianity depict the world will come to an end through a series of cataclysmic events followed by resurrection of departed souls and judgment day.

According to Vedic tradition, Aditi is mother of eight Adityas or solar deities (suns). At the end of creation these eight suns will shine together in the skies.

In the following sermon, the Buddha speaks of how seven suns will appear in the sky and how the planet earth will eventually be destroyed, after many hundreds and thousands of years, through a series of cataclysmic events which are described below.

  • The earth will suffer from a severe drought due to lack of rains. All vegetation and life forms will disappear and vanish from the planet.
  • A second sun will appear in the horizon, resulting in the evaporation of many streams and ponds.
  • A third sun will appear resulting in the evaporation of many great rivers like the Ganges.
  • After a long lapse of time, a fourth sun will appear in the sky resulting in the evaporation of great lakes.
  • After another long lapse of time, a fifth sun will appear and the oceans will dry up slowly till they will become a finger deep.
  • After another long lapse of time, a sixth sun will appear. The earth crust and core will heat up to intense temperatures resulting in many volcanic explosions, scorched earth and smoke filled skies.
  • After another vast interval, a seventh sun will appear. The earth will become a fiery ball of flame and expand. Its flames will spread far and wide. Finally it will explode and disappear altogether.

The manner in which the Buddha predicted the end of the earth sounds very much like a modern scientific theory on the destruction of planets and the entire solar system.

The Buddha also clearly mentions that all life forms will vanish before the appearance of the second sun. Thereafter the earth will be a dead planet ready for its eventual destruction.

The seven suns mentioned in the discourse probably are various planets of the solar system that would become hot and shine like stars due to some changes in the activity of the sun or its gravitational force.

The manner in which the drying up of the planet earth is described reminds one of the greenhouse effect and the events that might have happened on planets like Mars which had once oceans and rivers and probably life forms.

The Buddha delivered this sermon to remind his disciples of the impermanent nature of the world and of our existence, which is subject to decay and renewal and from which even a god like Brahma is not free unless he overcomes it by practicing Dhamma and following the eight-fold path.

Sources: Simple Capacity, Wikipedia, BBN, The Wisdom Awakened 


Alan Watts: “You Are the Big Bang”

Source: “You Are the Big Bang” – Alan Watts | Creative by Nature

creativesystemsthinking.wordpress.com

by

Sept 5, 2014

“Way out in space, and way out in time… billions of years ago, you were a big bang, but now you’re a complicated human being. And then we cut ourselves off, and don’t feel that we’re still the big bang. But you are.” ~Alan Watts

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“It’s like you took a bottle of ink and you threw it at a wall. Smash! And all that ink spread. And in the middle, it’s dense, isn’t it? And as it gets out on the edge, the little droplets get finer and finer and make more complicated patterns, see?

So in the same way, there was a big bang at the beginning of things and it spread. And you and I, sitting here in this room, as complicated human beings, are way, way out on the fringe of that bang. We are the complicated little patterns on the end of it. Very interesting.

But so we define ourselves as being only that. If you think that you are only inside your skin, you define yourself as one very complicated little curlique, way out on the edge of that explosion. Way out in space, and way out in time… billions of years ago, you were a big bang, but now you’re a complicated human being. And then we cut ourselves off, and don’t feel that we’re still the big bang.

But you are.

Depends how you define yourself. You are actually– if this is the way things started, if there was a big bang in the beginning– you’re not something that’s a result of the big bang. You’re not something that is a sort of puppet on the end of the process. You are still the process. You are the big bang, the original force of the universe, coming on as whoever you are.

When I meet you, I see not just what you define yourself as– Mr so-and- so, Ms so-and-so, Mrs so-and-so– I see every one of you as the primordial energy of the universe coming on at me in this particular way. I know I’m that, too. But we’ve learned to define ourselves as separate from it… ”

~Alan Watts~

Einstein on Bike

“A human being is a part of the whole called by us universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feeling as something separated from the rest, a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.” ~Albert Einstein

“You are not IN the universe, you ARE the universe, an intrinsic part of it. Ultimately you are not a person, but a focal point where the universe is becoming conscious of itself. What an amazing miracle.” ~Eckhart Tolle