The journey of a 1000 miles begins with a single step

Suffering

The suffering of others

Image may contain: 1 person, text that says '"When another person makes you suffer, it is because he suffers deeply within himself, and his suffering is spilling over. He does not need punishment; he needs help. That's the message he is sending." -Thich Nhat Hanh-'

Tao & Zen


Yes, there is tremendous suffering all over the world, but knowing this need not paralyze us

Image may contain: 1 person, text that says '"Working in mindfulness, we try our best to help, and we can have peace in our heart."'

“Yes, there is tremendous suffering all over the world, but knowing this need not paralyze us. If we practice mindful breathing, mindful walking, mindful sitting, and working in mindfulness, we try our best to help, and we can have peace in our heart.

Worrying does not accomplish anything. Even if you worry twenty times more, it will not change the situation of the world. In fact, your anxiety will only make things worse.

Even though things are not as we would like, we can still be content, knowing we are trying our best and will continue to do so. If we don’t know how to breathe, smile, and live every moment of our life deeply, we will never be able to help anyone.”

~Thich Nhat Hanh


Two wrong views

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Sorrow is suffering brought about by myself alone good Buddha?” asked Kassapa.

“No, Kassapa.”

“Then by another?”
“No, Kassapa.”

“Then both together, myself and another?”
“No, Kassapa.”

“Then is it brought about by chance?”
“No, Kassapa.”

“Then is there no suffering?”
“No, Kassapa, it is not that there is no suffering. For there is suffering.”

“Well then, perhaps you neither know nor see it, Buddha.”
“It is not that I don’t know suffering or don’t see it. I know it well and see it.”

“But to all my questions, good Buddha, you have answered no—and yet you say you know suffering and see it. Please teach me about it.”

“Kassapa, there are two wrong views. One says that oneself is the entire author of a deed and all consequent suffering one brings upon oneself and this is so from the beginning of time. The other says that it is deeds by other people that bring about one’s own suffering.

You should avoid both these views, Kassapa. Here we teach another way. All deeds, wether your own or another’s are conditionned by ignorance and that is the origin of this whole mass of suffering. By ending that ignorance in youself, and by way of yourself in others, wisdom comes into being and the suffering ceases. »

***SAMYUTTA NIKAYA


Rather than being trapped by your perceptions

We are naturally attached to comfort and pleasure and bothered by physical and mental suffering. These innate tendencies lead us to seek out, maintain and try to increase whatever gives us pleasure comfortable clothing, delicious food, agreeable places, sensual pleasure – and to avoid or destroy whatever we find unpleasant or painful. Constantly changing and devoid of any true essence, these sensations rest on the ephemeral association of the mind with the body, and it is useless to be attached to them. Rather than being dragged along and trapped by your perceptions, just let them dissolve as soon as they form, like letters traced on the surface of water with your finger disappearing as you draw them.

– Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

from the book “The Hundred Verses of Advice: Tibetan Buddhist Teachings on What Matters Most”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


The four noble truths

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Images magiques

When we talk about Dhamma, although we may say a lot, it can usually be brought down to four things. They are simply to know suffering, to know the cause of suffering, to know the end of suffering and to know the path of practice leading to the end of suffering.

This is all there is. All that we have experienced on the path of practice so far comes down to these four things. When we know these things, our problems are over.

Where are these four things born? They are born just within the body and the mind, nowhere else. So why is the teaching of the Buddha so detailed and extensive? This is so in order to explain these things in a more refined way, to help us to see them.

When Siddhattha Gotama was born into the world, before he saw the Dhamma, he was an ordinary person just like us. When he knew what he had to know, that is the truth of suffering, the cause, the end and the way leading to the end of suffering, he realized the Dhamma and became a perfectly Enlightened Buddha.

– Ajahn Chah

source: http://bit.ly/1jfogeT

Ajahn Chah on the web:
http://www.ajahnchah.org/
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai/chah/

Ajahn Chah biography:
https://forestsangha.org/ajahn-chah/biography

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


The Great Bell Chant (The End of Suffering)


Never take it for granted

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Since my son died eight months ago, it seems my Joie de vivre is gone forever. I have consumed countless hours of Buddhist philosophy but to no avail, it is like water off a duck’s back. I fear the future, regret the past, and tolerate the present. All of my responsibilities seem overwhelming. By global standards I am a wealthy man, still, anxiety haunts me day and night. I seek no advice, there is none that will suffice. I wish only to tell you this. All philosophy aside, the best reason to enjoy the present is because in the blink of an eye something irrevocable may occur and the best of life will suddenly be behind you, and all the philosophy ever conceived will not fix it. If you are finding joy in life never never never take it for granted!

Seiing impermanence deeply

Wisdom is the clear seeing of the impermanent, conditioned nature of all phenomena, knowing that whatever arises has the nature to cease. When we see this impermanence deeply, we no longer cling; and when we no longer cling, we come to the end of suffering.

– Joseph Goldstein

from the book “Insight Meditation: The Practice of Freedom”
ISBN: 978-1590300169 – https://amzn.to/2kln520

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Source of joy and suffering

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Whatever joy there is in this world

All comes from desiring others to be happy,
And whatever suffering there is in this world
All comes from desiring myself to be happy.

– Shantideva

quoted in the book “The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying”


When things fall apart

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“When things fall apart… is the time when the natural warmth of tenderness, the warmth of empathy and kindness, are just waiting to be uncovered, just waiting to be embraced. This is our chance to come out of our self-protecting bubble and to realize that we are never alone. This is our chance to understand that wherever we go, everyone, we meet is essentially just like us. Our own suffering, if we turn toward it, can open us to a loving relationship with the world.”

~ Pema Chödrön


Habit energy

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” Habit energy is pushing us; it pushes us to do things without our being aware. Sometimes we do something without knowing we’re doing it. Even when we don’t want to do something, we still do it. Sometimes we say, “I didn’t want to do it, but it’s stronger than me, it pushed me.” So that is a seed, a habit energy, which may have come from many generations in the past. We have inherited a lot.

With mindfulness, we can become aware of the habit energy that has been passed down to us. We might see that our parents or grandparents were also very weak in ways similar to us. We can be aware without judgment that our negative habits come from these ancestral roots. We can smile at our shortcomings, at our habit energy. With awareness, we have a choice; we can act another way. We can end the cycle of suffering right now.”

— Thích Nhất Hạnh


The real cause of our suffering

When you practice staying present, one thing you’ll quickly discover is how persistent the storyline is. Traditionally, in the Buddhist texts, our tendencies with their habitual story lines are described as seeds in the unconscious. When the right causes and conditions come together, these preexisting propensities pop up like flowers in the springtime. It’s helpful to contemplate that it’s these propensities and not what triggers them that are the real cause of our suffering.

– Pema Chödron

from the book “Living Beautifully with Uncertainty and Change”

With thanks to  Just Dharma Quotes


When someone hurts us

Image may contain: 1 person, text that says '"When another person makes you suffer, it is because he suffers deeply within himself, and his suffering is spilling over. does not need he needs help. That's the message he is sending. -Thich Nhat Hanh'

Tao & Zen


Keep on suffering

Birth, aging, illness, and death: these things are normal. Birth is the normal way of things, aging’s the normal way of things, illness and death are the normal way of things. Get so that you can see clearly that this is the way things normally are. That’s when a sense of disenchantment can arise. You’ll be able to loosen the grip that these things have on you. You’ll be able to pull them out, root and all.

We’ve suffered as the slaves of defilement and craving for how long now? Can you remember? Ask yourself. Can you remember all you’ve been through? And how much longer are you going to let it keep on happening — this holding and carrying and weighing yourself down? How many eons have you been doing this? Tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of eons. Can you count them all? Of course, you can’t. And how much longer will you have to keep on suffering in this way? If you’re still stubborn, still unwilling to listen to the Buddha’s teachings, this is the kind of reward you’ll have to expect out of life. Do you want it? Do you like it? If you don’t want it, then you’ll have to develop the goodness of your mind so that you can see your way out of this, so that you can see your defilements, so that you can see the suffering and harm they cause.

– Ajahn Fuang Jotiko

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes


Freedom Lies in the Wisdom to Choose

We establish some stability and focus in our mind and see which elements in it lead to greater peace, which to greater suffering. All of it — both the peace and the suffering — happens lawfully. Freedom lies in the wisdom to choose.


– Joseph Goldstein
from the book “Insight Meditation: The Practice of Freedom”

With thanks to Just Dharma Quotes

Compassion and suffering

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To develop compassion in ourselves, we need to practice mindful breathing, deep listening, and deep looking… Compassion contains deep concern. You know the other person is suffering, so you sit close to her. You look and listen deeply to her to be able to touch her pain. You are in deep communication, deep communion with her, and that alone brings some relief.

– Thich Nhat Hanh
Painting: © Anna Silivonchik

Two kinds of suffering

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It can be said that there are two kinds of suffering. Perhaps ninety-five percent of the suffering we endure every day is not at all necessary. Because of our lack of insight, we cause suffering to ourselves and others, including our beloved ones. But the remaining five percent is born out of contact with the real suffering around us and inside of us. To be aware of this kind of suffering brings about compassion, the energy necessary to transform ourselves and help relieve the suffering of the world.

– Thich Nhat Hanh
Painting: © Picasso


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Guilt and suffering

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Happiness is suffering in disguise

In truth, happiness is suffering in disguise but in such a subtle form that you don’t see it. If you cling to happiness, it’s the same as clinging to suffering, but you don’t realize it. When you hold on to happiness, it is impossible to throw away the inherent suffering. They’re inseparable like that. Thus the Buddha taught us to know suffering, see it as the inherent harm in happiness, to see them as equal. So be careful! When happiness arises, don’t be overjoyed, and don’t get carried away. When suffering comes, don’t despair, don’t lose yourself in it. See that they have the same equal value.

– Ajahn Chah


When we get angry, we suffer

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“When we get angry, we suffer. If you really understand that, you also will be able to understand that when the other person is angry, it means that she is suffering. When someone insults you or behaves violently towards you, you have to be intelligent enough to see that the person suffers from his own violence and anger. But we tend to forget. We think that we are the only one that suffers, and the other person is our oppressor. This is enough to make anger arise, and to strengthen our desire to punish. We want to punish the other person because we suffer. Then, we have anger in us; we have violence in us, just as they do. When we see that our suffering and anger are no different from their suffering and anger, we will behave more compassionately. So understanding the other is understanding yourself, and understanding yourself is understanding the other person. Everything must begin with you.”

~ Thich Nhat Hanh

ॐ Buddha Island ॐ


Becoming aware of suffering

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Imagine holding on to a hot burning coal. You would not fear letting go of it. In fact, once you noticed that you were holding on, you would probably drop it quickly. But we often do not recognize how we hold on to suffering. It seems to hold on to us. This is our practice: becoming aware of how suffering arises in our mind and of how we become identified with it, and learning to let it go. We learn through simple and direct observation, seeing the process over and over again until we understand.

– Joseph Goldstein

from the book “Insight Meditation: The Practice of Freedom”


It is not impermanence that makes us suffer

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Thich Nhat Hanh Philosophy & Practice


To think that you will be happy becoming something else is delusion

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Thich Nhat Hanh Philosophy & Practice


No mud, no lotus

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Thich Nhat Hanh Philosophy & Practice