The journey of a 1000 miles begins with a single step

Suffering

Compassion and suffering

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To develop compassion in ourselves, we need to practice mindful breathing, deep listening, and deep looking… Compassion contains deep concern. You know the other person is suffering, so you sit close to her. You look and listen deeply to her to be able to touch her pain. You are in deep communication, deep communion with her, and that alone brings some relief.

– Thich Nhat Hanh
Painting: © Anna Silivonchik
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Two kinds of suffering

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It can be said that there are two kinds of suffering. Perhaps ninety-five percent of the suffering we endure every day is not at all necessary. Because of our lack of insight, we cause suffering to ourselves and others, including our beloved ones. But the remaining five percent is born out of contact with the real suffering around us and inside of us. To be aware of this kind of suffering brings about compassion, the energy necessary to transform ourselves and help relieve the suffering of the world.

– Thich Nhat Hanh
Painting: © Picasso


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Guilt and suffering

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Happiness is suffering in disguise

In truth, happiness is suffering in disguise but in such a subtle form that you don’t see it. If you cling to happiness, it’s the same as clinging to suffering, but you don’t realize it. When you hold on to happiness, it is impossible to throw away the inherent suffering. They’re inseparable like that. Thus the Buddha taught us to know suffering, see it as the inherent harm in happiness, to see them as equal. So be careful! When happiness arises, don’t be overjoyed, and don’t get carried away. When suffering comes, don’t despair, don’t lose yourself in it. See that they have the same equal value.

– Ajahn Chah


When we get angry, we suffer

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“When we get angry, we suffer. If you really understand that, you also will be able to understand that when the other person is angry, it means that she is suffering. When someone insults you or behaves violently towards you, you have to be intelligent enough to see that the person suffers from his own violence and anger. But we tend to forget. We think that we are the only one that suffers, and the other person is our oppressor. This is enough to make anger arise, and to strengthen our desire to punish. We want to punish the other person because we suffer. Then, we have anger in us; we have violence in us, just as they do. When we see that our suffering and anger are no different from their suffering and anger, we will behave more compassionately. So understanding the other is understanding yourself, and understanding yourself is understanding the other person. Everything must begin with you.”

~ Thich Nhat Hanh

ॐ Buddha Island ॐ


Becoming aware of suffering

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Imagine holding on to a hot burning coal. You would not fear letting go of it. In fact, once you noticed that you were holding on, you would probably drop it quickly. But we often do not recognize how we hold on to suffering. It seems to hold on to us. This is our practice: becoming aware of how suffering arises in our mind and of how we become identified with it, and learning to let it go. We learn through simple and direct observation, seeing the process over and over again until we understand.

– Joseph Goldstein

from the book “Insight Meditation: The Practice of Freedom”


It is not impermanence that makes us suffer

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Thich Nhat Hanh Philosophy & Practice


To think that you will be happy becoming something else is delusion

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Thich Nhat Hanh Philosophy & Practice


No mud, no lotus

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Thich Nhat Hanh Philosophy & Practice


Sadness is an effective antidote to arrogance

“Suffering, in fact, can be helpful in many ways. It spurs your motivation and as many teachings point out, without suffering there would be no determination to be free from samsara. Sadness is an effective antidote to arrogance.”

~Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche