The journey of a 1000 miles begins with a single step

Practice

Go back and take care of yourself

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Thich Nhat Hanh’s Mindfulness Bell

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Stopping the extreme swings of the emotional pendulum

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Our emotions propel us through extremes, from elation to depression, from good experiences to bad, from happiness to sadness: a constant swinging back and forth. Emotionality is the by-product of hope and fear, attachment and aversion. We have hope because we are attached to something we want. We have fear because we are averse to something we don’t want. As we follow our emotions, reacting to our experiences, we create karma: a perpetual motion that inevitably determines our future. We need to stop the extreme swings of the emotional pendulum so that we can find a place of centeredness.– Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche


Attitude of a Dharma practitioner

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To put it simply, from the moment you enter the sacred Dharma and become a Dharma practitioner, your inner attitude and outer conduct should far surpass those of an ordinary mundane person. As the saying goes:

The sign of true learning is a peaceful temperament,
And the sign of having meditated is fewer afflictions.

If, on the contrary, your attitude and conduct are not even slightly better than an average person caught up in worldly affairs, you might consider yourself a scholar simply because you have some intellectual understanding of a few texts. Or you might think you are a perfect monk simply because you maintain celibacy. Or just because you know how to chant a few ritual texts, you might start thinking of yourself as a ngakpa. These are all just instances of blatant arrogance, and only go to show that even with the Dharma one can stumble in the direction of the unwholesome. As the incomparable Dakpo Lharje [Gampopa] said:

When it is not practised properly, even the Dharma can catapult one into the lower realms.

– Dudjom Rinpoche


Essenceless

This is what the dharma practitioner needs to understand — that the whole of samsara, or nirvana, is as essenceless or untrue as that film. Until we see this, it will be very difficult for dharma to sink into our minds. We will always be carried away, seduced by the glory and beauty of this world, by all the apparent success and failure. However, once we see, even just for a second, that these appearances are not real, we will gain a certain confidence. This doesn’t mean that we have to rush off to Nepal or India and become a monk or nun. We can still keep our jobs, wear a suit and tie and go with our briefcase to the office every day. We can still fall in love, offer our loved one flowers, exchange rings. But somewhere inside there is something telling us that all this is essenceless.

– Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche

Just Dharma Quotes


The path of curiosity

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The path of meditation and the path of our lives altogether has to do with curiosity, inquisitiveness. The ground is ourselves; we’re here to study ourselves and to get to know ourselves now, not later. People often say to me, “I wanted to come and have an interview with you, I wanted to write you a letter, I wanted to call you on the phone, but I wanted to wait until I was more together.” And I think, “Well, if you’re anything like me, you could wait forever!” So come as you are. The magic is being willing to open to that, being willing to be fully awake to that. One of the main discoveries of meditation is seeing how we continually run away from the present moment, how we avoid being here just as we are. That’s not considered to be a problem; the point is to see it.

– Pema Chödron

from the book “Awakening Loving-Kindness”

Just Dharma Quotes


The knack of refraining

Many of our escapes are involuntary: addiction and dissociating from painful feelings are two examples. Anyone who has worked with a strong addiction—compulsive eating, compulsive sex, abuse of substances, explosive anger, or any other behavior that’s out of control—knows that when the urge comes on it’s irresistible. The seduction is too strong. So we train again and again in less highly charged situations in which the urge is present but not so overwhelming. By training with everyday irritations, we develop the knack of refraining when the going gets rough. It takes patience and an understanding of how we’re hurting ourselves not to continue taking the same old escape route of speaking or acting out.

– Pema Chödron

from the book “Living Beautifully with Uncertainty and Change”

Just Dharma Quotes


Everyday actions and dharma

Image may contain: one or more peopleThose who see worldly life as an obstacle to dharma see no dharma in everyday actions. They have not yet discovered that there are no everyday actions outside of dharma.


– Dogen Zenji

quoted in the book “Teachers of Wisdom”


Spiritual practice

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Tao & Zen Community Forum


Dealing with negative energy

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Thich Nhat Hanh Philosophy & Practice


Uninterruptedly

greatmiddleway.wordpress.com
Sept 9, 2018

Related imageWhen you listen to holy beings frequently, collecting a little wisdom from them on each occasion, it is certain that, before long, you will have much to show for it.

Is there any vessel that would not be filled when a continuous stream of water falls into it uninterruptedly?

Matricheta